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Insignia of Officers of the Armed Forces of the United States
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Midshipmen's and Officer Candidate's Uniform Markings
Naval   officers   wear   the   following   grade devices; they are similar to the grade devices worn by  Army,  Air  Force,  and  Marine  officers: Grade Device Fleet admiral Five silver stars Admiral Four silver stars Vice  admiral Three silver stars Rear  admiral  (UH) Two silver stars Rear  admiral  (LH) One silver star Captain Silver spread eagle Commander Silver  oak  leaf Lieutenant  commander  Gold  oak  leaf Lieutenant Two  silver  bars Lieutenant  (jg) One silver bar Ensign One  gold  bar Commissioned   warrant   Dark   blue   bar   with officer silver   (W-4,   W-3)   or gold  (W-2)  breaks The   Navy   authorizes   officers   to   wear   two types  of  caps:  combination  and  garrison.  The combination  cap  has  a  stiff  visor  and  rigid- standing front. Officers wear it with a detachable blue, white, khaki, or aviation green (for aviation personnel) cap cover. The blue is prescribed only in  extremely  cold  weather.  The  color  of  the  cap cover and the uniform must match except for the white  cover,  which  officers  may  wear  with  both blue  and  white  uniforms.  They  have  the  option of wearing the garrison cap, which is either green or khaki, with a uniform of the same color. When authorized  by  proper  authority,  they  may  wear a  command  ball  cap  with  the  working  uniform. Combination caps worn by officers below the grade  of  commander  have  a  plain,  black  visor. Captains’   and   commanders’   visors   are   partly fretted  by  gold  embroidery;  flag  officers’  caps bear  full  visor  embroidery.  Cap  devices  consist of two crossed fouled anchors with a silver shield surmounted  by  a  spread  eagle.  Chin  straps  are faced  with  gold  lace. Personnel wear the rank device on the garrison cap  on  the  right  side  near  the  front  and  a miniature  cap  device  on  the  left  side. AIGUILLETTES  AND MOURNING  BADGES Officers  wear  aiguillettes  when  assigned  to  the following   duties: Personal  aide  to  the  President Aide  to  the  Vice  President Aide  at  the  White  House Aide  to  the  Secretary  of  Defense Aide  to  the  Secretary,  Undersecretary,  and Assistant  Secretaries  of  the  Navy Aide to the Deputy or Assistant Secretaries of Defense Aide  to  flag  officers Naval attache Aide to top ranking representatives of foreign nations visiting the United States Recruit   company   commander Recruit  company  commander  assistant U.S.  Navy  ceremonial  guard Officers  appointed  as  aides  on  the  staff  of  a governor  of  a  state  or  territory  may  wear aiguillettes  on  official  occasions. Aides to the President, to the Vice President, at the White House, and to foreign heads of state wear  them  on  the  right  side;  all  others  wear  them on the left. Officers wear them on the outside of overcoats  or  reefers. Service   aiguillettes   consist   of   loops   of gold   cord   with   a   blue   silk   insertion.   The one   worn   by   an   aide   to   the   President   has no   insertion.   The   aiguillette   cord   fastens   on the shoulder and then loops around the shoulder just   under   the   armpit.   The   number   of   loops indicates the wearer’s duty assignment or status (fig.  9-7). 9-8

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