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Glossary -Continued: Anchor Watch - Bend
APPENDIX  I GLOSSARY Upon  entering  a  new  occupation,  a  person usually  is  faced  with  a  need  to  learn  the vocabulary  of  the  trade  to  understand  and  be understood  by  his  or  her  co-workers.  The  Navy, especially,  has  a  language  all  its  own. This glossary is printed for your convenience. You  may  notice  the  absence  of  some  common Navy terms, as the glossary is not intended to be all-inclusive. Naval  Weapons  Publication  3  (Revision  E), Naval   Terminology,   is  an  excellent  source  of information for the definitions of naval terms and acronyms. AA —Abbreviation   for   antiaircraft. ABAFT  —Farther aft, as  “Abaft  the  beam.” ABEAM —On  a  relative  bearing  of  90  degrees (abeam  to  starboard)  or  270  degrees  (abeam  to port). ABOARD  —In or on a ship. Extended to use ashore, as  aboard  a  naval  station. ABREAST —Same as abeam. ACCOMMODATION  LADDER  —A  ladder suspended over and inclining down the side of a ship  to  enable  people  to  board  the  ship  from boats. ADRIFT  —Loose  from  moorings  and  out  of control.  Applied  to  anything  that  is  lost,  out  of hand,  or  left  lying  about. AFT  —Toward  the  stern.  Not  as  specific  as abaft. AFTER —That which is farthest aft, as after fireroom. AFTERNOON  WATCH  —The 1200 to 1600 watch. AGROUND   —When  any  part  of  a  ship  or boat is resting on the bottom. A ship runs  aground or goes  aground. AHOY  —A  hail  or  demand  for  attention,  as “Boat  ahoy.” ALEE  —In  the  direction  toward  which  the wind  is  blowing;  downwind. ALIVE —Lively,  energetic. ALL   FAST   —Tied   or   lashed   down   as necessary. ALL  HANDS  —The  entire  ship’s  company. ALOFT —Generally  speaking,  any  area  above the  highest  deck. ALONGSIDE —By the side of the pier or ship. AMIDSHIPS   —An  indefinite  area  midway between the bow and the stern.  Rudder  amidships means that the rudder is in line with the ship’s centerline. ANCHOR  —(1)  Any  device  used  to  make  a floating  body  fast  to  the  bottom.  (2)  The  act  of so making fast. (3) The act of securing or fixing the lower end of a guy or stay or the lower end of  a  shore. ANCHORAGE   —An  area  designated  to  be used  by  ships  for  anchoring. ANCHOR  BALL  —A  black  circular  shape hoisted  to  indicate  that  the  ship  is  anchored. ANCHOR  BUOY  —A small float secured to the anchor by a light line to mark the position of the  anchor. ANCHOR CABLE  —The line, wire, or chain that attaches a vessel to its anchor. AI-1

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