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United States Naval Academy -Continued - 12966_210
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Eligibility Criteria for Appointment
the same rigid academic pattern. New emphasis on  broadening  their  academic  opportunity  has expanded  the  old  basic  core  curriculum  into majors  ranging  from  aerospace  engineering,  to history,  to  oceanography.  A  little  more  than  a decade  ago,  all  midshipmen  took  the  same  40 courses.   Today’s   midshipmen   can   select   from more  than  500  courses,  including  political  science, languages,  and  computer  science. The  professional  changes  at  Annapolis  are also  important.  Along  with  the  emphasis  on broadening  the  academic  curriculum,  the Academy provides more intense officer training. Upperclassmen  have  more  of  the  responsibility  for plebe  training  and  for  leadership  of  the  entire 4,500-person  brigade  of  midshipmen. New buildings—modern, yet in harmony with the classic structures from the past—now line the Severn River. The twin towers of the science and mathematics  buildings,  Michelson  and  Chauvenet Halls,  have  been  in  use  since  1971.  The 560,000-volume Nimitz Library, dedicated in the fall  of  1973,  contains  complete  audiovisual  and closed-circuit  television  facilities.  Rickover  Hall, the Academy’s engineering studies complex, is as extensive   a   laboratory   facility   as   any   in   the nation. On  the  waterfront  rises  the  Robert  Crown Sailing Center, dedicated in April 1974. Built from privately  donated  funds,  the  center  houses  the Intercollegiate  Sailing  Hall  of  Fame.  It  also provides  facilities  for  the  Academy’s  program  of varsity  and  intramural  sailing  training,  Venerable Dahlgren Hall, for years an armory and drill hall, has  been  converted  with  private  donations  into the   Midshipman   Activity   Center.   This   center contains  a  hockey-size  skating  rink,  snack  bar, and  other  recreational  facilities. The  new  Brigade  Activity  Center,  which opened  in  1990,  can  seat  the  entire  brigade.  It houses a theater and concert hall and is used for brigade  professional  programs. Today’s  Academy  boasts  improved  facilities along  with  a  sophisticated  professional  training program   to   meet   the   more   complex   needs   of today’s  nuclear  Navy.  These  improvements  and the increased versatility of the academic program and  extracurricular  activities  provide  midshipmen with  a  well-balanced  education. Beginning with the class of 1980, the Academy offered this education to women as well as men. Under a new law passed by Congress, the Naval Academy admitted the first women midshipmen with   the   plebe   class   that   reported   in   July 1976. Instead   of   the   7   founding   professors,   the Academy  faculty  now  numbers  more  than  610. Half  of  the  faculty  are  naval  officers  who  serve on a rotating basis, bringing fresh thinking from the  fleet.  The  other  half  are  civilians,  ensuring continuity   and   input   from   the   academic community. Some  50  young  men  crowded  into  the  old barracks  of  the  10-acre  Fort  Severn  in  1845  to open  the  new  national  Naval  School.  Now  more than  4,500  midshipmen  walk  the  309  acres  of today’s   Naval   Academy. APPOINTMENT  PROCESS Appointments  are  granted  to  applicants  to  the Naval  Academy  by  either  their  Congressman  or the Vice President. The Vice President and each Congressman  may  have  five  of  their  appointees in  the  Academy  at  any  one  time.  They  may allocate  these  on  the  basis  of  1  principal  and  9 alternate  appointments  or  award  them  com- petitively  with  10  applicants  vying  for  each vacancy. Remaining   appointments   are   strictly   com- petitive  and  are  awarded  on  the  basis  of  those considered best qualified as set in the Academy’s “Whole-Person   Evaluation.”   Competitive   appoint- ments   are   available   in   the   following   general classes: 1. 2. 3. 4. Presidential Regular   Navy   and Marine  Corps Naval   and   Marine Corps  Reserve NROTC  students  and graduates  of  honor military   and   naval schools 100 each year to sons and daughters of mem- bers   of   the   Regular and  Reserve  compon- ents of the armed ser- vices who are on active duty  and  have  served continuously on active duty  for  at  least  8 years;  retired  person- nel;  and  those  who died  while  in  receipt  of retired pay 85   enlisted   members per year 85   enlisted   members per year 20 annually (normally 10  from  each  cate- gory) 10-7

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