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In  Peacetime
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The Salute
In  short,  in  peacetime,  wardroom  etiquette follows  the  old,  established  customs;  but  during a  war,  common  sense  and  necessity  dictate expedient   conduct. BOAT  ETIQUETTE Officers  observe  the  following  rules  of  boat etiquette: Unless  otherwise  directed  by  the  senior officer  present,  officers  enter  boats  in inverse  order  of  rank  (juniors  first)  and leave them in order of rank (juniors last). Juniors  may  stand  and  salute  when  a senior  enters  or  leaves  a  boat,  unless  an officer   or   petty   officer   is   in   charge   to render   the   honors.   However,   common sense and safety always prevail. When  a  senior  officer  is  present,  do  not sit in the stern seats unless asked to do so. Leave the most desirable seats for seniors. Always  offer  a  seat  to  a  senior. When  leaving  a  ship,  get  in  the  boat  a minute before the boat gong or when the OOD  says  the  boat  is  ready;  don’t  make a  last-second  dash  down  the  gangway. If the boat is crowded, juniors embark in the  next  boat. Juniors in boats take care to give seniors room  to  move  about. Don’t   use   the   thwarts,   gunwales,   and decking  of  another  boat  as  a  walkway without   permission.   Don’t   request   per- mission to use another boat as a walkway if  another  route  is  available. SOCIAL  CALLS Except  during  wartime,  when  the  practice is  almost  universally  canceled,  officers  first reporting to a command make a visit of courtesy to the commanding officer within 48 hours. That is  done  even  though  they  may  have  met  the captain  when  they  reported  for  duty.  The executive officer usually arranges a time for the visit. Aboard ship, the social call is made in the captain’s  cabin,  although  in  small  ships  the captain  may  dispense  with  the  formality  of courtesy visits. At an activity ashore, the commanding officer may  designate  “at   home”   hours   during   which juniors make their social calls. At other stations, the  commanding  officer  may  hold  periodic  “hail and   farewell”    cocktail  parties  during  which juniors  make  and  return  calls.  Newly  reported juniors  should  also  call  at  the  homes  of  their department head and executive officer within the first 2 weeks after they report aboard. If married, the  spouse  should  accompany  the  officer. Officers   making   courtesy   visits   to   the commanding officer’s cabin or office should never settle  back  for  a  long  conversation;  they  should remain   for   approximately   10   minutes,   unless requested  to  remain  longer.  They  should  be attentive  and  polite  but  not  servile  or  wooden. Although  they  should  allow  their  host  to  direct the conversation, they should try to add more to it  than  simply  affirmatives  and  negatives.  Officers should   refrain   from   asking   leading   questions about  their  new  duty,  about  military  problems facing  their  host,    or  about  intimate  details concerning the commanding officer’s private life. Officers   invited   to   dinner   should   take particular pains to be punctual and to leave before their welcome has worn out. They shouldn’t stay all  afternoon  or  evening.  A  visit  of  45  minutes to  an  hour  after  a  meal  is  all  that  courtesy demands;  they  should  ask  to  be  excused  within this  time  unless  urged  to  remain.  If  a  guest  of honor who is not a houseguest is present, other guests should await that individual’s departure, if  possible. CONDUCT  IN  FOREIGN  COUNTRIES When ashore in uniform in foreign countries, remember  that  your  conduct  will  represent  the conduct  of  all  members  of  the  United  States  naval service. Scrupulously respect the laws and customs of any foreign country. Infractions of a seemingly unimportant  nature,  even  though  committed unwittingly,  arouse  resentment  and  may  result  in serious  complications.  Under  no  circumstances should you enter into an altercation or argument with  anyone  abroad.  In  case  of  trouble  of  any nature, refer the matter to the appropriate U.S. naval authority ashore or afloat. If senior naval guidance  is  not  available,  consult  the  consular officer  or  diplomatic  representatives  of  the  United States. 7-10

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