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Chapter 18 External Equipment of Ships
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Mk 6 Mod 1 Life Raft
bow  and  are  secured  (housed)  in  the  hawsepipe. Stern   anchors   are   carried   on   the   stern.   On landing  ships  and  craft,  stern  anchors  are  used to assist them in pulling away from beaches. The  most  common  types  of  anchors  used aboard     ship     are     the stockless and the lightweight (or stock in crown). The two anchors shown  in  figure  18-2  are  of  Navy  design.  The stockless  types  are  used  chiefly  as  bow  anchors (bowers)   on   most   Navy   ships.   Originally,   the lightweight types were used  only  on  small  boats and as stern anchors on landing ships and craft. Recently,    however,    they    have    made    their appearance    as    bowers    for    several    types    of vessels. ANCHOR CHAIN Modern   Navy   anchor   chains   consist   of studded  links  of  high-strength  steel.  (Studs  are crosspieces   of   metal   forged   or   welded   in   the center  of  the  links  to  prevent  the  chain  from kinking.)  The  chains  are  made  up  of  15-fathom (90-foot)   sections   called   standard   shots.   The number of shots per chain depends on the size of the    ship.    Shots    are    secured    together    by detachable links that can be readily disassembled    whenever    the    chain    must    be broken. STOWING CHAIN As   the   chain   comes   aboard,   it   passes along  the  deck  on  metal  flash  plates,  over  the wildcat,   and   down   into   the   chain   locker,   as shown in figure 18-1. Its bitter end is secured to a ring bolt on the bulkhead of the chain locker. Figure 18-2.—Anchor types. ANCHOR WINDLASSES The    Navy    uses    two    types    of    anchor windlasses   for   lifting   the   ship’s   anchor.   Most combatant ships use the vertical shaft type (fig. 18- 1).    Amphibious    and    auxiliary    ships    use    the horizontal shaft type. Both types are equipped with wildcats,   which   engage   the   link   of   the   anchor chain.  The  wildcat  may  be  disengaged  when  the capstan    (vertical    type)    or    the    gypsy    heads (horizontal  type)  are  used  for  handling  lines  or wire. BOATS AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT Some  ships  carry  boats  used  to  transport personnel.  These  boats  can  be  used  for  routine  or survival   purposes.   Another   type   of   boat,   the lifeboat, is used strictly for survival purposes. BOATS The term boat refers to a noncommissioned waterborne   vessel   that   is   not   designated   as   a service    craft.    A    boat    is    capable    of    limited independent    operation.    Officer    and    personnel boats,  motor  whaleboats,  and  utility  boats  fit  into this  group.  Boats  carried  aboard  ship  that  can  be hoisted from and lowered into the water are known as ship’s boats. LIFEBOATS AND LIFE RAFTS A  warship  does  not  have  room  for  all  the powerboats needed to transport the entire  crew  in a survival situation. At sea, a power boat is usually difficult,   and   sometimes   impossible,   to   launch rapidly.  For  these  reasons,  the  Navy  has  spent time   and   expense   developing   efficient   lifeboats other than powerboats. Several  types  of  inflatable  lifeboats  or  life rafts  are  used  by  the  Navy.  Each  boat  or  raft  is stocked with enough survival equipment to support the  number  of  survivors  the  boat  was  designed  to carry.  The  survival  gear  includes  a  canopy,  a  sea anchor,   a   lifeline,   boarding   line,   a   rain-catcher tube,  air  hand  pumps,  paddles,  sponges,  a  repair kit  for  patching  leaks,  and  a  floatable  knife.  The Mk 6 Mod 1 inflatable life raft also carries desalter kits  for  turning  seawater  into  freshwater.  In  the survival  kits  are  food  rations,  sea  marker  dye,  a flashlight,  batteries,  a  signal  mirror,  a  whistle,  a first-aid kit, a distress signal kit, and containers of freshwater.  The  survival  kits  in  the  Mk  6  25-man life raft can sustain 25 people for 5 days on regular rations. The general arrangement of the Mk  6  life raft is shown in figure 18-3. 18-2

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