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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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History of Sea Power
CHAPTER 1 NAVAL SEA POWER 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. LEARNING  OBJECTIVES Learning  objectives  are  stated  at  the  beginning  of  each  chapter.  These  learning objectives  serve  as  a  preview  of  the  information  you  are  expected  to  learn in   the   chapter. By   successfully   completing   the   nonresident training  course  (NRTC),  you  indicate  you  have  met  the  objectives  and  have learned  the  information.  The  learning  objectives  for  chapter  1  are  listed  below. Upon  completion  of  this  chapter,  you  should  be  able  to  do  the  following: Define  sea  power. 9. Define  the  establishment  of  the  Continental navy. Portray  naval  operations  of  the  Civil  War. 11. Describe  naval  operations  of  World  War  I. Identify   naval   operations   of   World   War   II.   12. Describe   naval   operations   of   the   Korean   13. conflict  and  the  Vietnam  conflict. Describe  naval  operations  in  the  Persian  Gulf.  14. State  the  reasons  why  a  strong  Navy  is  needed  15. to  support  our  national  objectives. Identify  the  mission  of  the  U.S.  Navy. State the four mission areas in which the Navy carries  out  its  function. Analyze  the  Soviet  military  threat. Analyze  the  Soviet  political  threat. Describe  Soviet  naval  capabilities. Outline  the  Soviet  naval  personnel  structure. Identify treaties and pacts of which the United States  is  a  member. Sea  power  as  a  concept  means  more  than military  power  at  sea.  The  Navy’s  definition  of sea  power  is  explained  in  the  following  paragraph: Sea  power  is  the  sum  of  a  nation’s capabilities to implement its interests in the ocean,   by   using   the   ocean   areas   for political, economic, and military activities in peace or war in order to attain national objectives—with  principal  components  of sea  power  being  naval  power,  ocean science,  ocean  industry,  and  ocean  com- merce. The  first  use  of  the  term  sea  power  was  by Captain  Alfred  Thayer  Mahan,  USN,  in  his principal work,  The Influence of Sea Power Upon History,  1660-1783,   published  in  1890.  Mahan explained six conditions required for a nation to have  sea  power:  (1)  an  advantageous  geographical position;   (2)   serviceable   coastlines,   abundant natural   resources,   and   a   favorable   climate; (3)   extent   of   territory;   (4)   a   population   large enough to defend its territory; (5) a society with an aptitude for the sea and commercial enterprise; and  (6)  a  government  with  the  influence  to dominate  the  sea. 1-1 10.

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