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Summary - 12966_299
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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CHAPTER 17 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. SHIP DESIGN AND ENGINEERING LEARNING  OBJECTIVES Upon  completion  of  this  chapter,  you  should  be  able  to  do  the  following: Identify   the   major   components   of   a   ship’s   6. structure. Describe   the   use   and   identification   of   7. compartments  of  a  ship. Describe   the   conventional   steam   turbine   8. propulsion  plant. Describe  the  diesel  propulsion  plant. 9. Describe  the  gas  turbine  propulsion  plant. Describe  the  nuclear  propulsion  plant. Describe  the  damage  control  organization  on Navy  ships. Identify  the  types  of  fires  and  their  primary extinguishing agents. Describe the importance of preventive damage control. SIGNIFICANT  DATES 17  Apr.  1866 9  Nov.  1880 18  Dec.  1929 17 Jan. 1955 $5,000   appropriated   by   Con- gress  to  test  the  use  of  petro- leum  oil  as  fuel  for  ships’ boilers. First  steam-powered  ship  to circle globe, USS  Ticonderoga, ends  cruise  begun  on  7  Dec. 1878. First    use    of    a    ship    (USS Lexington) to furnish electrical power  for  a  major  city  takes place  at  Tacoma,  Washington, when that city suffers a power failure. World’s  first  atomic  submarine, USS  Nautilus,  sweeps   into Long  Island  Sound  at  start of  maiden  voyage,  signaling back  to  New  London,  Con- necticut,  “Underway  on  nuclear power  .  .  .” Looking at two different types of Navy ships, you might notice several differences. Upon closer comparison, however, you might also notice many similarities.  All  use  compartmentation  to  increase their ability to remain afloat in case they suffer damage.  All  use  some  type  of  propulsion  plant and provide their own electrical power. They also use   similar   damage   control   equipment   and procedures. In  this  chapter  we  will  look  at  some  of  the similarities  and  differences  of  Navy  ships.  We  will also give a brief overview of the various types of propulsion plants used by these ships. Lastly, we will  look  at  one  of  the  most  important  areas shipboard personnel have to deal with—damage control. SHIP’S  BASIC  STRUCTURE The  major  components  of  a  ship’s  structure include  the  plating,  keel,  framing,  bulkheads,  and decks. Each plays a part in creating a ship from a  mass  of  steel. 17-1

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