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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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The First Subamrine
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Describe CHAPTER 2 MAKERS   OF   NAVAL   TRADITION LEARNING  OBJECTIVES Upon  completion  of  this  chapter,  you  should  be  able  to  do  the  following: the  importance  of  the  Navy’s  first 6. submarine. Describe  the  events  leading  to  the  quasi-war  7. with France. Identify  the  effect  of  the  Union  blockade  in 8. the  Civil  War. 9. Recognize the importance of ironclad ships in the  development  of  the  naval  warship. 10. Recognize the events of the Spanish-American War.- 11. Describe  the  use  of  convoys  in  combating German  submarines. Identify  the  makers  of  naval  tradition  in World  War  II. Identify the makers of naval tradition in the Korean   conflict. Identify the makers of naval tradition during the  Vietnam  conflict. Describe the operations of the Persian Gulf. Trace  the  role  of  women  in  the  Navy. MAKERS  OF  NAVAL  TRADITION A visitor to the Naval Academy at Annapolis is  impressed  by  the  innumerable  reminders  of  our naval  heritage.  Here  is  found  the  memorial  to John Paul Jones, which keeps alive his memory so that those who follow may go on with lasting inspiration.  In  Bancroft  Hall  hangs  Oliver  Hazard Perry’s   flag   of   blue,   bearing   in   rough,   white muslin letters James Lawrence’s famous slogan, “Don’t  give  up  the  ship.”  On  all  sides  appear monuments  and  buildings  commemorating  the names  and  deeds  of  great  American  naval  heroes. The wide brick walk, called Decatur Walk, leads to   the   Tripoli   Monument.   The   gymnasium   is known  as  MacDonough  Hall,  and  the  massive armory is named Dahlgren Hall. Other buildings bear  names  such  as  Lute  Hall,  Mahan  Hall, Maury  Hall,  and  Sampson  Hall.  All  those  for whom  these  monuments  and  buildings  were named  were  makers  of  naval  tradition. AMERICAN   REVOLUTION SIGNIFICANT   DATES 13 Oct. 1775 5  Nov.  1779 4  Feb.  1779 18 Jul. 1792 American  navy  is  formed. John  Paul  Jones  takes  command of  Bonhomme   Richard   i n France. Congress  appoints  Esek  Hopkins as  commander-in-chief  of  the fleet. The  “Father  of  the  American navy,” John Paul Jones, dies in Paris,  France. The revolutionary war was the only period in our  history  in  which  the  United  States  lacked imported   strategic   materials.   However,   the 2-1

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