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Surface-Launched Antiair Warfare (AAW) Missiles
CGN-38,  and  CG-47  classes  of  ships  carry  the Mk 45. 5"/38 The  5"/38  semiautomatic  DP  gun  was  the mainstay of the U.S. Navy from 1939 until the late 1960s.    Single    or    twin    mounts    made    up    the secondary     batteries     on     early     cruisers     and battleships. One or two single mounts are now the main  battery  of  the  older  DDs,  FFs,  and  guided- missile  frigates  (FFGs).  The  twin  mounts  are  the secondary  gun  battery  on  battleships  (BBs).  For short periods, an efficient gun  crew  can  get  off  15 rounds   per   minute   for   single   mounts   and   30 rounds  per  minute  for  single  twin  mounts.  The projectile  weighs  55  pounds  and  has  an  effective range of 18,000 yards. 3"/50 The  dual-purpose,  semiautomatic  3"/50 gun  was  planned  during  World  War  II.  The enemy’s use  of  combat  suicide  planes  and  dive bombers    prompted    the    need    for    rapid-fire weapons  having  a  larger  explosive  projectile than 40-mm guns. Although the 3"/50 gun  was not  produced  in  time  for  wartime  service,  it proved  to  be  a  very  effective  gun.  Becoming standard   throughout   much   of   the   fleet,   it replaced    the    40-mm    twin    and    quadruple mounts   on   all   combat   ships.   Most   of   the mounts    installed    were    open    twin    mounts; however,  a  few  single  mounts  were  installed. The   3"/50   fires   45   rounds   per   minute   per barrel  and  has  a  range  of  14,200  yards.  A  few of  these  mounts  remain  on  major  combatant ships,   but   most   are   found   on   auxiliary   and amphibious landing ships. 76-MM/62 The Mk 75 76-mm/62-caliber, rapid-fire, dual-purpose  gun  mount  was  developed  in  the late  1960s  to  combat  increased  aircraft  target speeds  and  the  cruise  missile  threat.  Because of     its     light     weight,     it     is     suitable     for installation on the new guided-missile frigates and   missile   hydrofoil   boats.   It   is   a   water- cooled  single  mount  with  a  rate  of  fire  of  85 rounds  per  minute  and  a  maximum  range  of 17,800   yards.   The   gunhouse,   which   is   not manned,    requires    only    three    handlers    to reload the magazine. CLOSE-IN WEAPON SYSTEM (CIWS) The  close-in  weapon  system  (CIWS)  was developed to provide the fleet with a close-range, hard  defense   against   antiship   cruise   missiles, fixed-wing   aircraft,   and   surface   targets.   The system is  an  automatic,  fast-reaction,  computer- controlled  radar  with  a  rapid-fire  20-millimeter gun.   It   combines   a   single-mount   fire   control radar  and  a  six-barrel  Gatling  gun  that  fires depleted-uranium  projectiles  at  a  rate  of  3,000 rounds  per  minute.  Its  projectiles  are  2.5  times heavier  than  those  made  of  steel.  The  system has    a    high-kill    probability.    This    system    is suitable for installation on most ships as a single unit. It permits smaller ships to have a degree of self-protection   never   before   possible.   (See   fig. 20-2.) GUN FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT Gun  fire  control  equipment  must  solve  a difficult   problem.  It must direct the guns to hit Figure 20-2.—Close-in weapon system (CIWS). 20-3

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