Quantcast Compartment Numbering System

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Compartment Numbering System
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Compartmentation
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Convensional Steam Turbines
Countless  holes  pierce  watertight  compart- ments to accommodate doors and hatches; water, steam,   oil   and   air   piping;   electrical   cables; ventilation  ducts;  and  other  necessary  utilities. Each  hole  is  plugged  by  a  stuffing  tube,  a  pipe spool, or some other device to prevent water from leaking in and around piping and cables. Piping and  ventilation  ducts  are  equipped  with  cutoff valves  or  other  closures  at  each  main  bulkhead so that they can be closed off if ruptured. Ships enforce   rigid   restrictions   against   opening watertight  doors  or  hatches  during  action  or  in dangerous waters. A ship must take all of these “defense”  precautions  to  ensure  its  full  fighting capability. The  main  transverse  watertight  bulkheads contain  no  access  doors  or  hatches  below  the damage  control  deck.  The  damage  control  deck is the lowest deck that permits fore-and-aft access, and  that  access  is  by  watertight  doors.  The damage  control  deck  is  usually  the  first  deck below  the  main  deck. Compartment Numbering System This chapter does not discuss the numbering system  for  compartments  of  ships  built  before 1949.  However,  if  you  are  stationed  aboard  one of these ships, you will be required to learn that numbering system as part of your damage control qualification. In ships built after March 1949, each compart- ment number indicates that compartment’s deck number, frame number, relation to the centerline of  the  ship,  and  usage.  A  hyphen  separates  the numbers  and  letters  representing  each  type  of information.  The  following  is  an  example  of  a common  compartment  number  and  what  each part  of  the  number  represents: 3-75-4-M 3-third   deck 75-forward  boundary  at  or  immediately abaft  of  frame  75 4-second  compartment  outboard  of  CL  to port M—ammunition    compartment We  will  now  explain  how  each  part  of  the compartment  number  is  assigned. DECK  NUMBER.  —The  main  deck  is  deck number  1.  The  first  deck  or  horizontal  division below  the  main  deck  is  number  2;  the  second below, number 3; and so forth. If a compartment extends down to the shell of the ship, the number assigned  the  bottom  compartment  is  used.  The first  horizontal  division  above  the  main  deck  is number 01, the second above 02, and so on. The deck  number,  indicating  its  vertical  position within  the  ship,  becomes  the  first  part  of  the compartment   number. FRAME  NUMBER.  —The frame number at the foremost bulkhead of the enclosing boundary of  a  compartment  is  its  frame  location  number. When  a  forward  boundary  lies  between  frames, the  frame  number  forward  is  used.  Fractional numbers  are  used  only  when  frame  spacing exceeds  4  feet. RELATION  TO  CENTERLINE.  —Compart- ments  through  which  the  centerline  of  the  ship passes carry the number 0 in the third part of the compartment  number.  Compartments  located completely  to  starboard  of  the  centerline  have  odd numbers;   those   completely   to   port   bear   even numbers.  Two  or  more  compartments  that  have the  same  deck  and  frame  number  and  are  entirely starboard or entirely port of the centerline have consecutively higher odd or even numbers, as the case   may   be.   They   are   numbered   from   the centerline   outboard.   For   example,   the   first compartment  outboard  of  the  centerline  to starboard is 1; the second, 3; and so on. Similarly, the first compartment outboard of the centerline to  port  is  2;  the  second,  4;  and  so  on. COMPARTMENT   USAGE.   —The  fourth and  last  part  of  the  compartment  number  is  a capital letter that identifies the assigned primary usage  of  the  compartment.  Since  most  ships  do not consider a secondary usage of compartments, they   identify   them   by   a   single   letter   only. However, dry and liquid cargo ships do not follow this  practice.  These  ships  use  a  double-letter identification  to  designate  compartments  assigned to   cargo   carrying.   Ships   assign   letter identifications  as  follows: Letter  and  Category Types  of  Spaces A—Dry   stowage Storerooms,   issue rooms, refrigerated spaces C—Ship  control  and Plotting  rooms,  CIC, fire  control  operating radio,  radar,  sonar spaces operating  spaces,  pilot- house 17-5

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.