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Punitive Articles of the UCMJ
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avoid pursuers becomes an accessory after the fact to the prisoner’s escape. Provisions include transportation, clothing, money, or any other necessities. Art. 79. Conviction of Lesser Included Offense An accused maybe found guilty of an offense necessarily included in  the  offense  charged  or  of  an  attempt  to  commit  either  the  offense charged  or  an  offense  necessarily  included  therein. A  military  tribunal  may  only  try  a  person  who  has  been  charged  with violating a particular article or articles of the UCMJ. Quite simply, if a person committed what is considered a crime but the code did not include that crime in one of its punitive articles, no court-martial could try him or her. Articles 77,  78,  80,  81,  and  82  of  the  code,  thus,  encompass  persons  who  may  not have  taken  an  active  part  in  or  successfully  committed  an  offense.  These articles  permit  persons  to  be  tried  for  being  an  accomplice  in  a  crime,  even though  the  crime  isn’t  included  in  the  UCMJ. Article 79 goes a step further by authorizing the finding of guilty of a lesser included offense when a finding of guilty cannot be sustained for the offense charged. For this reason, a charge has three permissible findings: guilty; not guilty;  not  guilty,  but  guilty  of  a  violation  of  article                        . The  key  words  in  article  79  are   “offense  necessarily  included  in  the offense   charged.”  For  example,  a  violation  of  article  85  (Desertion)  “with intent   to   remain   away   therefrom   permanently”—invariably   is   also   an uncharged violation of the lesser charge of article 86 (Absent without leave). Proving  that  an  accused  deserter  had  no  intention  of  ever  returning  might be  impossible.  But  the  date  the  person  absented  himself  or  herself  and  the date the person (was) returned to military jurisdiction are clear. Thus, many deserters  are,  for  lack  of  proof  of  intent,  found  not  guilty,  but  guilty  of  a violation  of  article  86. Other examples of what generally are held to be lesser included offenses contained  in  a  principal  offense  include  the  following: Article 83 94 94 95 118 122 124 Principal   Offense Fraudulent enlistment, appointment,  or  separa- tion Mutiny Sedition Breach of arrest Murder Robbery Maiming Article 3 92 116 134 119 121 128 Lesser  Included  Offense Jurisdiction   to   try   certain personnel Failure  to  obey  lawful  order Breach  of  the  peace Breach  of  restriction Manslaughter Larceny Assault   with   a   dangerous weapon 6-12

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