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Appendix I Glossary: AA - Anchor Cable
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Glossary -Continued: Berth - Broadside
ANCHOR  WATCH   —A  group  of  persons available  to  the  OOD  during  the  night  for  such duties  as  heaving  in  or  paying  out  the  cable. ANNUNCIATOR  —A  device,  usually  elec- tromechanical,   used   to   indicate   or   transmit information.  See  Engine  Order  Telegraph. ARMAMENT   —The  weapons  of  a  ship. ARMORED DECK —A deck, below the main deck,   that   provides   added   protection   to   vital spaces. ASTERN  —Directly behind a ship. ATHWART  —Across;  at  right  angles  to. AUXILIARY  —(1)  Extra,  or  secondary,  as auxiliary engine. (2) A vessel whose mission is to supply  or  support  the  combatant  forces. AVAST  —Stop,  as  “Avast  heaving.” AYE  AYE  —Reply  to  a  command  or  order, meaning  “I  understand  and  will  obey.” BACK  —(1)  Togo  backwards.  (2)  Act  of  the wind  in  changing  direction  counterclockwise. BACKSTAY   —Piece  of  standing  rigging leading  aft. BAIL —(1) To rid a boat of water by dipping it  out.  (2)  A  rigid  member  affording  support  at two end points, as the  bail (handle)  of  a  bucket or  the  support  for  an  accommodation  ladder. BALLAST  —Weight  (solid  or  liquid)  loaded into  a  ship  to  increase  stability. BAR —A long, narrow shoal across a harbor entrance. BARBETTE   —A  heavily  armored  cylinder extended  downward  from  a  gun  turret  to  the lowest armored deck to provide protection to the turret below the gunhouse and the projectile- and powder-handling  crews. BARGE  —(1)  A  blunt-ended,  flat-bottomed, waterborne   craft,   usually   non-self-propelled, used  to  haul  supplies  or  garbage.  (2)  A  type  of motorboat assigned for the personal use of a flag officer. BARNACLES —Small shellfish that are found attached to bottoms of vessels, pilings, and other submerged structures. BATTEN  —(1) A long strip of steel wedged against the edges of tarpaulins on a hatch to make the  hatch  watertight.  (2)  Removable  wood  or  steel members used in a ship’s holds to keep cargo from shifting. BATTEN   DOWN   —The  act  of  applying battens to a hatch. Extended to mean the closing of  any  watertight  fixture. BATTLE  LANTERN  —A   battery-powered lantern  for  emergency  use. BEAM —(1) The extreme breadth of a vessel. (2)  A  transverse  frame  supporting  a  deck. BEAR —The act of locating a particular point, or   bearing,   as “The  lighthouse  bears  0 45 degrees.” BEAR A HAND —(1) Provide assistance, as “Bear  a  hand  with  rigging  this  stage.”  (2)  Ex- pedite, as in  “Bear a hand with readiness for sea reports.” BEARING  —The direction of an object from an observer, measured in degrees clockwise from a  reference  point.  True  bearing  is  the  angular difference between lines drawn from the observer to true north and to the object; magnetic  bearing is  the   direction   of   the   object   measured   on   a magnetic  compass;  relative bearing is  the  angle between  the  ship’s  head  and  the  object. BECKET —(1) An eye for securing one end of a line to a block. (2) A rope eye on a cargo net, ( 3 )    S h o r t e n e d    f o r m    o f    b e c k e t    b e n d . BECKET BEND —A knot used to tie two lines together. BELAY —(1) To secure a line to a fixed point, (2) Order to disregard a previous order or to stop an  action,  as  “Belay  the  last  order,”  or  “Belay the  small  talk.” BELOW  —Downward,  beneath,  or  beyond something, as to lay below; below the flight deck; below  the  horizon. BEND —To join two lines together; the type of  knot  so  used. AI-2

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