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Glossary -Continued: Landing Ship - Mainmast
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Glossary -Continued: Party - Ride
MAN —To assume a station, as to man a gun. MAN-O-WAR  —See  Combatant  Ship. MARLINE  —Two-strand,   left-laid,   tarred hemp. MARLINESPHCE  —Tapered steel tool used to open  the  strands  of  wire  for  splicing. MARLINESPIKE SEAMANSHIP —The art of  caring  for  and  handling  all  types  of  line  and wire. MASTER-AT-ARMS  —A member of a ship’s police   force. MASTHEAD  LIGHT   —A   20-point,   white running light located in the fore part of the ship; it  may  or  may  not  be  on  the  foremast. MATE  —A  shipmate;  another  sailor. MEET  HER  —Slow  the  swing  of  a  ship  by putting  on  opposite  rudder. MESS —(1) Meal. (2) Place where meals are eaten, as mess hall. (3) A group of personnel who take  meals  together,  as  the  officers’  mess. MESSENGER   —(1)  A  line  used  to  haul another heavier line across an intervening space. (2)  One  who  delivers  messages. MIDWATCH —The watch that begins at 0000 and ends at 0400. MIND  YOUR  RUDDER  —An  order  to  the helmsman  to  steer  the  proper  course. MONKEY FIST —A  complicated  knot  worked into the end of a heaving line to provide weight. MOOR  —(1)  To  anchor,  using  two  anchors. (2) To make fast to a mooring buoy. (3) To make fast  to  a  pier  or  another  ship. MOORING BUOY  —A large, anchored float to  which  a  ship  may  moor. MORNING   WATCH   —The  0400  to  0800 watch. MOTOR  WHALEBOAT  —A   double-ended powerboat. MUSTER   —(1)  A  roll  call.  (2)  The  act  of assembling  for  a  roll  call. NEST  —(1)  Two  or  more  boats  stowed  one within  the  other.  (2)  Two  or  more  ships  moored alongside  each  other. NOTHING TO THE RIGHT (LEFT) —Order given  to  the  helmsman  not  to  allow  the  ship  to come to right (left) of the course because of some danger  lying  on  that  side  of  the  course. NUN  BUOY  —A  navigational  buoy,  conical in  shape,  that  marks  the  starboard  side  of  a channel  from  seaward.  Even  numbered  and painted red. OAKUM  —Tarred hemp fiber used to caulk seams  in  wooden  decks  and  boats. OOD — Officer of the deck. OFFSHORE  —Some distance off the shore, as  contrasted  to  inshore. ON THE BEACH  —Ashore;  also  applied  to a  sailor  who  is  assigned  to  shore  duty  or  is unemployed, retired, or otherwise detached from sea duty. OUTBOARD  —Away  from  the  centerline. OVERBOARD  —Over the side. OVERHAND KNOT —Simplest of all knots; made  by  passing  one  end  of  a  line  once  around its standing part. OVERHAUL  —(1) To repair or recondition. (2)  To  overtake  another  vessel. OVERHEAD  —The   underside   of   a   deck forming  the  ceiling  of  the  compartment  below; never called a ceiling. PAINTER  —Line used to make a boat fast by its bow. When used under way, the  painter  causes the  boat  to  swing  out  from  the  side  of  the ship. PARCEL  —The act of wrapping a line with narrow canvas strips to provide waterproofing or to   build   up   a   symmetrical   shape   for   further covering. AI-10

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