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When Not to Salute
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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During Military Funerals
When  a  member  of  the  guard  is  engaged  in performance of a duty that prevents saluting In  action  or  under  simulated  combat  con- ditions At  mess  (When  addressed,  stop  eating  and show  respectful  attention.) HAND  SALUTES  ON FORMAL   OCCASIONS Formal   occasions   require   hand   salutes according to the situation. At a military ceremony and  when  the  occasion  requires,  an  officer  or enlisted person salutes rather than uncovers, as that  is  the  traditional  mark  of  respect. When  an  officer  officially  attends  a  military funeral,  a  salute  is  appropriate  at  the  following times: Whenever  honors  are  rendered When  the  body  is  removed  from  the  hearse to the chapel, from the chapel to the caisson, and  from  the  caisson  to  the  grave When  the  volleys  are  fired When   “Taps”   is   sounded Participants  at  a  nonmilitary  funeral  or  burial service  may  follow  the  civilian  custom  of  un- covering (rather than saluting) when such honors are  called  for.  For  example,  they  might  uncover during  the  procession  to  the  grave  or  the  lowering of  the  body. Jewish  custom  calls  for  remaining  covered during all religious ceremonies. The usual rules regarding   uncovering   do   not   apply   when   a representative of that faith conducts the service. Additionally, personnel may wear a skullcap (yarmulke) with the uniform whenever a military cap, hat, or other headgear is not prescribed. They also  may  wear  a  skullcap  underneath  military headgear as long as it does not interfere with the proper wearing, functioning, or appearance of the prescribed  headgear. During  National  Anthem When the national anthem is played, persons in the naval service stand at attention, facing the colors,  if  displayed;  otherwise,  they  face  the  sound of the music. If covered, they begin the salute at the  first  note  and  end  it  at  the  last  note. When   in   ranks,   the   officer   in   charge   orders, “Attention,”   and renders the appropriate hand or sword salute for the formation. In boats, only the  boat  officer–or,  in  the  officer’s  absence,  the coxswain–stands  and  salutes  when  the  national anthem is played. Other members of the crew, and passengers  who  are  already  standing,  stand  at attention. All others remain seated at attention. Personnel in civilian clothing standing at attention in  a  boat  during  the  pIaying  of  the  national anthem  do  not  render  the  “hand-over-heart” salute.  That  is  an  exception  to  the  general rule. The   above   rules   apply   only   to   a   formal rendition  of  the  national  anthem.  For  example, if  you  were  in  uniform  and  heard  “The  Star- Spangled  Banner”  being  broadcast  over  the  radio, you would not be expected to stop, face the music, and  salute.  However,  you  would  render  the required  honors  if  you  were  attending  a  public gathering where the anthem was being broadcast as  part  of  the  ceremony. During Parades Military personnel salute the flag when they are  passed  by  or  pass  the  flag  being  carried uncased  in  a  parade  or  military  formation. Funerals  and  Religious  Services During  funerals  (fig.  7-5),  officers  and  enlisted personnel remain covered while in the open but uncover during the committal service at the grave. During  burial  services  at  sea,  they  remain  covered throughout  the  service. During  religious  services  aboard  ship  and during  formal  religious  ceremonies  outdoors ashore (such as Easter sunrise service), members remain  uncovered  throughout  the  ceremony. In general, a military person uncovers during a religious ceremony but remains covered during a  military  ceremony.  Religious  ceremonies  include church   services,    civilian   funerals,   or   burial services an officer or enlisted person attends as a friend of a relative rather than as a represent- ative of the Navy. Military funerals and burials 7-16

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