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World War II -Continued
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134.2 The sun sets in Tokyo Bay on the Allied naval might gathered there on the eve of world peace, 27 August 1945. potential is equally important in weakening its sea power. Admiral Ernest J. King, former Chief of Naval Operations,   summarized   the    part    sea    power played in World War II: In  the  European  war,  seapower  was an    essential    factor    because    of    the necessity    of    transmitting    our    entire military  effort  across  the  Atlantic  and supporting it there. Without command of the  sea,  this  could  not  have  been  done. Nevertheless, the surrender of land, sea, and air forces of the German Reich on 8 May  1945  was  the  direct  result  of  the application of airpower over land and the power of the allied ground forces. In  the  Pacific  war,  the  power  of  our ground   and   strategic   air   forces,   like seapower    in    the    Atlantic,    was    an essential factor. By contrast with Germany, however, Japan’s armies were intact and undefeated and her air forces only  weakened  when  she  surrendered, but her navy had been destroyed and her merchant fleet had been fatally crippled. Dependent  upon  imported  food  and  raw materials and relying upon sea transport to   supply   her   armies   at   home   and overseas, Japan lost the war because she lost command of the sea and, in doing so, lost—to  the  United  States—  the  island bases    from    which    her    war-making potential could be destroyed by air. KOREAN CONFLICT On  26  June  1950  the  United  Nations  made  a joint decision to give the Republic of Korea air and naval  assistance.  Three  days  later,  the  cruiser USS Juneau and the destroyer USS Dehaven fired the first bombardment of the conflict. 1-8

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