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Chapter 14 United States Marine Corps
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Marine Corps Function
halted  Communist  expansion  in  the  Caribbean— the  first  U.S.  victory  ever  over  a  Marxist  state. Battle,    success,    and    victory    have    become    a tradition for the United States Marine Corps. MARINE CORPS TRADITION The  U.S.  Marine  Corps,  perhaps  to  a  greater degree than any other military service, shows the power of pride in tradition to unify and motivate a fighting  force.  Almost  as  soon  as  they  become members  of  the  organization,  marines  learn  that traditions  are  as  much  a  part  of  their  equipment as their pack or  rifle.  These  traditions  have  been growing   since   the   Continental   Marines   were organized on 10 November 1775, the birth date of the   Corps.   Marine   Corps   tradition   has   many phases:  discipline,  devotion  to  duty,  leadership, loyalty, self-sacrifice, versatility, and pride in a job well done (fig. 14-1). Reflections of Marine Corps tradition  are  found  in  the  uniform,  the  insignia, the  words  of  the  “Marines’  Hymn,”  and  in  their nicknames they have earned through the years. The   familiar   emblem   of   the   U.S.   Marine Corps—the  eagle,  globe,  and  anchor  (fig.  14-2)— was   officially   adopted   in   1868.   It   symbolizes worldwide    service    in    a    seagoing    force—the “soldiers of the sea.” The spread eagle holds in its beak streamers that bear the Marine Corps motto, Semper    Fidelis    (Always    Faithful),    officially adopted in 1883. The  “Marines’  Hymn”  originated  from  a  verse written   by   an   unknown   marine   during    the Mexican   War.   This   verse,   “From   the   Halls   of Montezuma  to  the  Shores  of  Tripoli,”  became  the first verse of the hymn (fig. 14-3). The  Marine  Corps  march,  “Semper   Fidelis,” was  composed  in  1888  by  John  Philip  Sousa,  at that  time  leader  of  the  Marine  Band.  The  band played for the first presidential inauguration in 134.51 Figure 14-1.-The marines of Marine Barracks 8th and I, “the oldest post of the Corps, ” on parade at the Marine Corps War Memorial, Arlington, Virginia. Rugged in combat, U.S. Marines on parade present the perfect example of proper military bearing. 14-2

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