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Pay and Allowances - 12966_78
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Commissary and Exchange Privileges
of  living  in  a  particular  area.  VHA  is  based  on your grade and geographic location. Surveys are conducted  periodically  to  determine  the  amount of VHA for each geographic region of the United States. You forfeit VHA, as well as BAQ, if you reside in government quarters. Basic Allowance for Subsistence (BAS) Since all officers must pay their own mess bills, they  are  entitled  to  a  monthly  allowance  for subsistence  without  regard  to  grade  or  dependency status.  All  officers,  whether  on  board  ship  or ashore, whether married or single, receive a basic allowance  for  subsistence  (BAS). Family  Separation  Allowance  (FSA) Members  assigned  to  a  deployable  unit  are paid  a  family  separation  allowance  (FSA)  of  $2 per  day  when  they  have  been  away  from  their home  port  in  excess  of  30  days.  That  allowance continues until the member’s unit returns to the home  port. Dislocation Allowance (DLA) Personnel  with  dependents  are  entitled  to  a dislocation  allowance  (DLA)  upon  a  permanent change  of  station.  It  is  paid  to  help  defray  the abnormal expenses incurred in such a move. The amount  is  equal  to  one  month’s  basic  allowance for  quarters  to  which  the  person  is  entitled. Miscellaneous Additional  allowances  are  paid  for  things  such as  initial  uniform  allowance,  mileage  expenses  for travel under orders, and per diem payments for temporary  additional  duty.  Their  specifications differ, but the basic idea is the same: a temporary payment  to  help  defray  expenses  of  an  unusual nature  arising  from  official  duty. BENEFITS From the time naval officers begin active duty, they   are   entitled   to   many   valuable   benefits. Those   benefits   considered   traditional   include commissary  privileges,  various  assistance  pro- grams, and retirement. Benefits are estimated to add  about  15  percent  to  a  an  officer’s  pay. MEDICAL  AND  DENTAL  CARE Medical  and  dental  care  are  available  to  all members  of  the  armed  services  on  active  duty. Regardless of where members are stationed, they have immediate access to full and complete care through the facilities of all the armed forces and the  Public  Health  Service. The Navy naturally is vitally concerned with the health of its members. It establishes physical qualifications  for  procurement  and  ensures  the maintenance   of   these   standards   throughout the   member’s   entire   period   of   active   service. Additional  physical  qualifications  are  required  for aviation,  submarine  duty,  and  other  special programs. The rigors of a career in the Navy can- not be withstood by a person who is not in good physical   condition.   Should   a   person   become injured   or   ill   while   on   active   duty,   however, restoring the person to health as soon as possible is obviously in the person’s best interest as well as  the  Navy’s. Regulations  governing  medical  care  for  retirees and   dependents   are   contained   in   SECNAV Instruction  6320.8D,  which  represents  a  joint statement by the armed forces, Coast Guard, and Public Health Service. The regulations prescribe policies   and   procedures   for   administering   the Uniformed   Services   Health   Benefits   Program (previously known as Medicare) as authorized by Title  10,  U.S.  Code,  for  all  the  uniformed  services. The  law  provides  a  uniform  level  of  care, through  either  military  or  civilian  facilities,  for (1)   retired   personnel,   (2)   dependents   of   both active-duty   and   retired   members,   and   (3) dependents of deceased members who died while on  active  duty  or  retired.  Retired  persons  are entitled to the same health benefits in uniformed services facilities as active-duty members, except retirees are subject to space availability and staff capabilities.   (The   Veterans   Administration, however, is responsible for the hospitalization of persons  retired  because  of  a  physical  disability or  of  a  service-connected  disease  or  injury.) Exceptions  to  entitlement  of  medical  care  for dependents,  which  are  few,  include  dental  care, domiciliary or custodial care, prosthetic devices, hearing  aids,  spectacles,  and  orthopedic  footwear. Medical  services  at  uniformed  services  facilities may be provided to dependents subject to space availability  and  the  capabilities  of  the  professional staff. In  general,  retirees  and  all  dependents  should use  uniformed  services  medical  facilities  if  they are  adequate  and  available.  An  integral  part  of 3-17

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