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and expanded missions for the Naval Reserve. The purpose of these missions is to complement total force requirements. The twin goals of the surface Reserve programs are readiness and responsibility. In meeting these goals, the surface Reserve will be a full and equal partner with the Active Forces in  the  defense  of  this  nation. NAVAL  AIR  RESERVE  FORCE PROGRAM The  Naval  Air  Reserve  Force  is  responsible  for providing mission-capable, task-performing units available for immediate mobilization and deploy- ment.  It  is  an  operating  command  of  the  Chief of   Naval   Operations   under   the   direction   of Commander  Naval  Air  Reserve  Force.  The  Air Program’s sponsor, representative, and technical manager is the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for  Air  Warfare.  If  full  or  partial  mobilization were  required,  the  CNO  would  assign  wings, squadrons, and units as needed to various Active Fleet-type commanders. Each wing, squadron, or unit  would  then  become  an  integral  part  of  its command. Air Reserve squadrons normally operate their own  assigned  aircraft  and  equipment.  They  are a striking example of the hardware-oriented type of   Reserve   the   total   force   Navy   requires. Squadrons are, for the most part, equipped with combat-deployable,   fleet-compatible   aircraft.   A continuing  program  ensures  units  are  re-equipped and retrained to meet current fleet requirements consistent with mission objectives and budgetary constraints. The  mission,  complexity  of  equipment,  and inherent  problems  in  the  operation  and  use  of systems  used  by  the  Naval  Air  Reserve  Force require  extensive  and  continuous  training.  To reach and maintain a high state of readiness, the Reserve   Force   provides   training   at   naval   air stations, facilities, and satellite activities (Naval Air  Reserve  Units  and  Centers)  throughout  the United States. RETIREMENT  POINT  CREDIT To  qualify  for  retired  pay,  a  member  of  the Reserve Forces must be credited with at least 50 retirement points a year for 20 years. The total number  of  points  earned  is  a  factor  in  the computation  of  retirement  pay.  If  otherwise eligible,  the  member  may  begin  drawing  retire- ment pay at age 60. Earning 35 retirement points per year satisfies the  requirement  for  retirement  credit  because  a reservist  is  allowed  15  gratuitous  points  for maintaining an Active status. The reservist earns 1 retirement point for each day of Active service whether  it  is  extended  active  duty  or  annual training. When not on active duty, the reservist receives  1  retirement  point  for  each  completed drill. The reservist may earn additional points by completing   approved   correspondence   courses prepared  by  the  Naval  Education  and  Training Program   Management   Support   Activity,   other Navy  sources,  or  the  other  armed  forces.  Members receive   an   appropriate   number   of   retirement points  for  each  course.  When  not  on  extended active duty, the member may receive a maximum of 60 points per year retirement credit plus those received  for  annual  training. SUMMARY The Naval Reserve is a full partner with the Active  Forces.  The  existence  of  task-oriented, mission-capable units has made the Naval Reserve a  vital  and  contributing  participant  in  the  defense of  the  nation. As   a   byproduct   of   their   training,   naval reservists are capable of serving side by side with their  active-duty  counterparts  in  direct  support  of the  fleet.  This  unprecedented  degree  of  integration has developed a healthy feeling of mutual support. Such mutual support encompasses most mis- sion  areas.  This  integration  is  also  a  preferred method of training, since tasks performed during peacetime  are  similar  to  those  expected  at  the outbreak  of  hostilities.  Perhaps  equally  important is  the  satisfaction  reservists  get  from  training duty. Today  the  total  partnership  between  the  Navy and the Naval Reserve has made the total force concept  a  reality.  In  the  years  ahead  the  Naval Reserve  will  absorb  additional  responsibilities. Therefore, its major challenge will be to recruit, train,  and  retain  the  numbers  and  types  of reservists necessary to fulfill its expanding role. 15-6

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