Quantcast Naval Aviation Cadet

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Naval Aviation Cadet
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
A Number of Programs Seve as the Navy's Source of Procuring Trained Officers
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Enlisted Commissioning Program
OFFICER  PROCUREMENT SIGNIFICANT   DATES 22  Dec.  1775 25  Jul.  1777 17  Dec.  1810 11  Jul.  1846 26  Jun.  1884 2 May 1955 Commissions  are  approved  for first   Regular   officers   of   the Navy. Subsistence   of   naval   officers while in foreign ports is autho- rized  by  Congress. Future  Admiral  David  G.  Far- ragut is appointed to the rank of midshipman. First Naval Academy graduate, Richmond   Aulicks,   commis- sioned  a  passed  midshipman. Commissioning   of   Naval Academy  graduates  as  ensigns authorized  by  Congress. Navy   announces   the   Aviation Officer   Candidate   Program. The current requirement for naval officers on active duty is about 71,000. Approximately 6,200 persons are commissioned as Regular or Reserve officers and ordered to active duty each year. The Navy’s active-duty officer programs are aimed at the   fulfillment   of   established   goals   based   on projected   requirements.   The   Regular   officer procurement  programs  do  not  provide  sufficient officers  to  maintain  the  USN  structure.  Therefore, qualified Reserve officers who apply are selected for USN status as needed to maintain the career officer  cadre  of  the  Navy. Our naval officers are procured from several different  sources  (fig.  3-1).  A  career  as  a  naval officer  is  open  to  civilians  through  the  Naval Academy or a college NROTC program (NROTC programs  are  the  largest  source).  Selected  civilian college  graduates  who  are  qualified  in  appropriate specialties   may   receive   a   direct   appointment. Officer   Candidate   School   (OCS)   and   Aviation Officer  Candidate  School  (AOCS)  are  open  to civilians and military personnel who have earned a degree. For enlisted personnel already serving in  the  Navy,  other  routes  are  discussed  in  the following   paragraphs. NAVAL   AVIATION   CADET The   Naval   Aviation   Cadet   (NAVCAD) Program  provides  naval  aviation  training  to qualified  men  and  women  with  2  or  more  years of  approved  college  courses. When   NAVCADs   successfully   complete aviation  training,  they  are  appointed  as  officers in  the  Naval  Reserve  and  designated  as  Navy pilots. The  NAVCAD  Program  is  open  to  qualified civilians  and  enlisted  personnel  who  have  not previously   been   disenrolled   from   any   flight program. Eligibility  Requirements: 1. 2. 3. 4. Age—At  least  19,  but  not  have  reached 25th  birthday  before  reporting  to  AOCS. Citizenship—United  States  citizen  only. Marital  Status—Single  with  no  dependents; must  remain  single  until  commissioning. There  are  no  exceptions  to  this  rule. Additionally,  they  must  meet  all  physical requirements, including 20/20 uncorrected vision  and  height  limitations. NAVCAD  applicants  must  complete  AOCS and attend basic and advanced flight training. The NAVCAD   is   obligated   for   6   years   of   active commissioned   service   after   becoming   a   naval aviator. CHIEF  WARRANT  OFFICER (CWO)   PROGRAM The  mounting  sophistication  of  ships,  aircraft, and   weapons   systems   requires   commissioned officer specialists. These officers must be able to closely  supervise  complicated  machinery  and weapons as well as the enlisted technicians who maintain  and  operate  them. A   chief   warrant   officer,   although   commis- sioned  from  the  enlisted  ranks,  bridges  the  gap between the enlisted and commissioned structures. The  CWO  structure  provides  flexibility  in  two separate areas. A chief warrant officer grows in competence  during  his  or  her  progression  through the enlisted and warrant fields, while remaining within  a  specific  technical  field  or  job  skill.  The CWO can also be assigned repeatedly to similar billets  largely  irrespective  of  grade  within  the structure. The CWO Program is open to both men and women.  It  provides  a  path  of  advancement  to warrant   status   for   chief   petty   officers   of   the 3-3

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.