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Embarkation
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Radiotelephone (R/T)
from their ports of embarkation; their passage at sea; and their approach to, and arrival in, assigned positions  in  the  objective  area.  The  plan  must include the movement of ships through rehearsal, staging,  and  rendezvous  areas.  Therefore,  the movement  plan  organizes  the  amphibious  task force into movement groups, which proceed along prescribed   routes.   Usually   ships   are   assigned into fast or slow movement groups, depending on their sustained sea speed. Forces that may not be a  part  of  the  amphibious  task  force  provide protection   from   air,   surface,   and   subsurface attack.  Carrier  striking  forces  provide  air  cover and long-range reconnaissance. In addition, mine warfare ships perform screening duties with the help of other ships suitable for that purpose but with  other  primary  functions.  The  safety  of  the amphibious  ships  with  their  embarked  troops, equipment, and  supplies  is  of  paramount importance.  Landing  forces  must  arrive  at  the objective area without critical reduction in their combat   potential. THE  ASSAULT The  assault  phase  begins  when  the  assault forces   arrive   at   their   assigned   positions   in the amphibious objective area. It ends when the mission  has  been  accomplished. After all the prior planning and rehearsals and final movement into the objective area, the assault commences.  The  assault  phase  encompasses  the following: Preparation  of  the  beach  by  air  strikes  and naval  gunfire Ship-to-shore   movement   of   the   landing force  by  helicopters,  landing  craft, amphibious  vehicles,  and  landing  ships Landings  in  landing  and  drop  zones  and on beaches by the assault elements of the landing  force Inland   operations   to   unify   waterborne, helicopter-borne,   airborne,   and/or   air- landed   assault   forces   and   to   seize   the beachhead Air  support  and  naval  gunfire  support throughout  the  assault Landing of remaining land force elements to  conduct  any  operations  necessary  to complete   the   accomplishment   of   the mission The  assault  phase  is  a  time  when  coordination of  the  operation  is  extremely  critical.  The amphibious   task   force   commander,   who   has responsibility  for  the  overall  coordination  of  air and naval gunfire support, preplans to the greatest extent   possible.   Delivery   of   unscheduled   fire support on targets of opportunity and unexpected changes   in   air   operations   require   continuous and   close   coordination.   Only   through   this coordination  can  the  amphibious  task  force  be assured  of  maximum  effectiveness  with  a  requisite degree  of  safety.  The  principles  and  procedures of  fire  support  coordination  haven’t  changed because  of  the  introduction  of  nuclear  weapons. However,   the   importance   and   extent   of   co- ordination   have   increased   because   of   the magnitude  of  nuclear  weapons  effects. The   amphibious   task   force   commander eventually shifts control of land operations to the landing  force  commander.  That  happens  when both commanders agree that the landing force is firmly established ashore and ready to assume full responsibility   for   subsequent   operations.   The amphibious  operation  is  then  terminated  with  the amphibious task force remaining in support. The various  units  of  the  amphibious  task  force  may then  be  used  for  operations  in  the  area  or reembarked  on  the  ships  from  which  they  were dispatched. NAVAL  TELECOMMUNICATIONS Communications  is  the  key  to  command.  It involves  the  transmission  and  reception  of  military instructions  and  information;  it  is  at  once  the voice  of  command  and  the  arm  of  control.  It makes  coordinated  action  possible  by  enabling  our ships  and  aircraft  to  operate  in  a  purposeful, cooperative  effort.  Modern  naval  operations  can only  be  executed  with  effective  communications and a master battle plan. All details of the plan must   be   communicated   to   the   fighting   units. Communications  enables  those  at  the  highest echelons of command to test missions, objectives, and enemy capability and to determine appropriate courses  of  action. Engagement  in  a  full-scale  war  would  allow no  time  for  our  nation  to  obtain  quantities of   telecommunications   equipment   and   train thousands  of  personnel  to  use  it.  Naval  tele- communications,  being  a  function  of  command, must  always  be  in  a  condition  of  preparedness. In  the  event  of  hostilities,  the  operating  forces would  depend  on  communications  facilities  in existence at the time. 12-17

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