Quantcast Patrol Combatants

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Patrol Combatants
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Ohio-Class SSBNs
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Amphibious Assault Ships
craft  developed  by  the  Navy.  It  displaces  16,600  to 18,700  tons.  The  size  of  the  Trident  submarine  is dictated by the larger size missile required for ranges of  4,000  to  6,000  miles  and  the  larger  reactor  plant required  to  drive  the  ship.  The  submarine  has  24 tubes  for  the  Trident  II  missile  and  4  torpedo  tubes located in the bow. A nuclear-powered  attack  submarine,  like  that  of the Sturgeon class, displaces 3,800 to 4,700 tons and has  four  torpedo  tubes.  The  new  Los  Angeles-class fast-attack submarines displace about 7,000 tons and have  four  torpedo  tubes.  Notice  in  figure  19-9  how much larger the SSBN is than the SSN. You can also see the bow of a second Los Angeles-class SSN at the top right of the figure. Although possessing different missions, both are super-powered submarines. Early  submarines  were  named  after  marine  life. The   first   SSBNs,   however,   were   given   names   of persons well known in American history, like George Washington, Patrick Henry, and Lafayette. New  fast-attack  submarines   (SSNs)   are   named after  American  cities—like  the  Los  Angeles,  Baton Rouge,   and   Memphis.   The   Tridents   (SSBNs)   are being named after American states-like the Ohio and the Michigan. Other Combatants Other  ships  classified  as  combatants  are  patrol combatant ships, amphibious warfare ships, and mine warfare ships. PATROL  COMBATANTS.  —Patrol  combatants fall  into  two  categories:  patrol  combatant  (PG)  and guided-missile patrol combatant (hydrofoil) (PHM). The  patrol  combatant  was  developed  because  of increased    emphasis    on    counterinsurgency    and unconventional    warfare    operations.    The    PG    is designed    for    good    sea-keeping    qualities,    long endurance,    a    high    payload,    and    high    speed capabilities. Although the PG is not a torpedo boat, it can operate in shallow coastal waters and is capable of   combating   coastal   shipping   as   well   as   enemy torpedo boats. The  main  propulsion  plant  of  the  gunboat  uses  a combination  of  diesel  and  gas  (turbine)  (CODAG). This  combination  achieves  the  greatest  possible  fuel economy  and  maximum  endurance  time  on  station. Two  diesel  engines  drive  the  twin  propellers  during maneuvering   and   cruising   speeds,   the   gunboat’s normal  operating  condition.  When  high  speeds  are needed,   the   diesels   are   declutched   and   the   gas turbine is clutched to the propeller shafts for speeds over 40 knots. The PG is constructed of aluminum and fiberglass, is 165 feet long, has a beam of 24 feet, and displaces 225 to  245  tons.  Its  armament  consists  of  one  3"/50- caliber gun, one 40-mm gun, and four 50-caliber twin machine guns. The  newer  patrol  combatant  ships  are  guided- missile   patrol   combatant   (hydrofoil)   ships   (PHM). Figure 19-10 shows the first of the class, 134.190 Figure 19-10.-Uss Pegasus (PHM-1), a patrol hydrofoil missile ship. 19-11

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.