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arise.  At  the  present  time,  these  deviations  are required because of the increasing size of the shore establishment and the shortage of career officers. In addition to the requirements for rotation, assignment   patterns   reflect   the   need   for   the following   considerations: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Educational  opportunities  for  overall career  value  or  for  a  particular  billet A  progression  of  responsibility Assignment   to   duty   with   Reserve components Assignment  of  duty  with  joint  or  allied staffs  or  with  the  Office  of  the  Secretary of  Defense  (SECDEF) Use  of  specialized  training Officers   should   realize   they   are   primarily responsible  for  planning  their  own  career  and should  therefore  indicate  their  assignment preferences  to  the  Bureau  of  Naval  Personnel. All commissioned officers complete an Officer Preference  and  Personal  Information  Card (NAVPERS  1301/1)  on  initial  appointment  and upon  recall  to  active  duty.  Additionally,  they should submit a new card 12 months before their projected  rotation  date  (PRD)  and  whenever significant  changes  occur. This  card  contains  a  wealth  of  information that  is  very  useful  to  the  detailing  officer.  It  is construed  as  a  current  reflection  of  the  officer’s preferences, and its timely and accurate submis- sion  is  extremely  important. Personal  letters  may  be  submitted  if  special circumstances  not  appropriate  for  inclusion  on  the preference  card  arise.  The  information  is  made a part of the detailing record and is acted upon if  practicable.    These  letters  to  the  detailer do not become a part of the officers’s permanent record. Officers  desiring  special  courses  of  instruction, changes  of  duty,  clarification  of  orders,  date  of release from active duty, extensions, retention in the  Navy,  and  so  forth,  should  indicate  this  by a  letter  forwarded  through  the  chain  of  command. Such  letters  become  a  permanent  part  of  an officer’s  record. Figure  3-6,  A,  shows  a  typical  professional development  pattern  for  a  surface  warfare  officer, and figure 3-6, B, shows the pattern for a surface nuclear officer. Officers do not normally perform the types of duties in the exact sequence shown; rather, they should gain experience in the type of tour related to the phase of development through which  they  are  passing.  For  instance,  if  you  select a career as a surface warfare officer, you may stay at sea the first 5 years because of operational re- quirements  or  personal  choice  or  both.  During  this time  you  will  strive  to  attain  qualifications  as division  officer,  officer  of  the  deck,  department head, and surface warfare officer. Then you may rotate ashore to staff duty or to attend the Naval Postgraduate   School.   Although   you   did   not follow  the  development  plan  exactly,  you  will  have obtained  the  experience  and  qualifications necessary to make you competitive with your year- group  peers. Figure 3-6, C and D, show an example of the professional   development   patterns   for   a   sub- marine officer and an aviation officer. The typical professional development paths for supply corps officers  and  general  unrestricted  line  (URL) officers  are  depicted  in  figure  3-6,  E  and  F. The  career  path  for  female  officers  in  the restricted  line  and  staff  corps  parallels  that  of  the male  officers  except  as  constrained  by  law.  The career   progression   for   female   aviators   and surface  warfare  officers  parallels  that  for  their male  counterparts  but  is  restricted  to  the  force support   subcommunity. A relatively new and important role for naval officers  is  a  joint-duty  tour.  A  joint-duty  tour  is a tour served with other branches of the armed forces.  It  provides  the  officer  with  a  first-hand perspective of how the Navy interacts with other branches  of  the  service. Many billets are available for joint-duty tours in  places  such  as  the  Office  of  the  Secretary  of Defense,   the   White   House,   the   U.S.   Space Command,  and  the  Joint  Chiefs  of  Staff.  Every effort  possible  is  made  by  detailers  to  send  our best  performers  to  a  joint-duty  tour. Increased  emphasis  is  being  placed  on  the importance of such tours. All officers aspiring to flag rank should seek a joint-duty tour. Tours are usually  assigned  at  the  lieutenant  commander  level or  above  for  a  length  of  3  years. OFFICER PROMOTIONS The  Navy’s  officer  corps  is  structured  like  a pyramid.  Starting  with  a  wide  base  of  junior officers at the bottom, it rises to a relatively few flag officers near the pinnacle and ends with one officer,  the  Chief  of  Naval  Operations,  at  the top.  The  officer  corps  structure  consists  of  21 competitive  categories,  or  groups,  of  officers possessing  similar  skills,  education,  and  training. 3-12

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