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Introducing and Addressing Naval Personnel - 12966_148
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Boarding a Ship in Civilian Attire
Civilians  often  feel  uncomfortable  in  social gatherings  when  addressing  enlisted  personnel  as described in the preceding paragraph. Therefore, those   outside   the   service   customarily   address enlisted   personnel   in   the   same   manner   they address civilians. In other words they prefix their names   with   “Mr.,”   “Mrs.,”   “Miss,”   or   “Ms.,” as  the  case  may  be.  When  introducing  enlisted personnel to civilians, give their title and name, then the mode of address, such as “This is Petty Officer  Smith.  Mr.  Smith  will  be  visiting  us  for a   while.” Only one response to an oral order is proper: “Aye,  aye,  sir/ma’am.”  This  reply  means  more than  yes.  It  indicates,  I  understand  and  will  obey. Responses  to  an  order  such  as  “O.  K.,  sir”  or “Alright,   sir”   are   improper.   A   senior   may properly acknowledge a report made by a junior by  saying,  “Very  well,”  but  a  junior  never  says “Very  well”  to  a  senior. Use   “sir/ma’am”   as   a   prefix   to   an   official report,  statement,  or  question  addressed  to  a senior. Also use it when addressing an official on duty   representing   a   senior.   For   example,   the officer  of  the  deck  (OOD),  regardless  of  grade, represents   the   commanding   officer;   therefore, address  the  OOD  as  “sir/ma,’am.” Juniors addressing a senior should introduce themselves unless certain the senior knows them by sight. Junior   and   senior   officers   observe   certain differences in phrasing. Senior officers send their “compliments” to juniors. For example, “Admiral Smith   presents   his   compliments   to   Captain Brown.”   Juniors   send   their   “respects.”   When making  a  call  upon  a  commanding  officer,  the junior  is  correct  in  saying,  “Captain,  I  came  to pay  my  respects.”  If  an  orderly  or  a  secretary presents guests to the captain, ask the orderly or secretary to “please tell the captain that Ensign Jones  would  like  to  pay  her  respects.” In  written  correspondence,  a  senior  officer may  “call”  attention  to  something,  but  a  junior may   only   “invite”   it.   For   many   years,   Navy custom   prescribed   that   a   junior   writing   a memorandum to a senior use the complimentary close “Very respectfully” and a senior writing to a  junior  use  “Respectfully.”  Some  officers  and enlisted  still  follow  that  custom  when  writing memorandums. However, the Department of the Navy  Correspondence   Manual,   SECNAVINST 5216.5C,  states  that  “a  complimentary  close  is  not desired  or  required.” QUARTERDECK   ETIQUETTE Quarterdeck  etiquette  remains  the  same  in peace and war. The quarterdeck has always been honored  as  part  of  the  ship  on  which  official ceremonies   are   conducted.   It   still   retains   its sanctity. Because of that sanctity, you cannot just walk  on  and  off  a  ship  as  you  would  enter  and leave   your   home;   you   must   follow   certain procedures. Quarterdeck Conduct The  watch  officer  should  strictly  enforce  the etiquette  of  the  quarterdeck.  The  quarterdeck should  be  kept  immaculate  and  its  ceremonial character  maintained.  On  the  quarterdeck, officers and enlisted persons alike must adhere to the  following  rules  of  etiquette: Avoid  appearing  out  of  uniform. Never smoke. Refrain  from  putting  hands  in  pockets. Don’t   engage   in   recreational   athletics unless they are sanctioned by the captain, and  then  only  after  working  hours. Boarding a Ship in Uniform When  in  uniform  and  boarding  ANY  ship flying the national ensign, salute in the following order: 1.  Halt  at  the  gangway,  face  aft,  and  salute the ensign. 2. Turn to the officer of the deck (OOD) and salute. When returning to your own ship, salute the OOD  and  say,   ‘‘I  report  my  return  aboard, sir/ma’am.”  The  OOD  returns  both  salutes  and responds   with,   “Very   well,”   or   a   similar expression. When  you  salute  the  OOD  upon  boarding  a ship  other  than  your  own,  say,  “I  request permission  to  come  aboard,  sir/ma’am  .  .  .”  and then add the purpose of your visit; for example, “.  .  .  to  visit  a  friend,”  or  ‘‘.  .  .  to  go  to  small stores.” 7-7

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