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Dead Horse
standards of neatness and good behavior as those required of men in uniform. In short, they were fitted into  the  Navy  as  an integral part of the service. They slipped into the same  spot  in  the  chain  of  command  as  the  men they replaced and performed the same duties. This system  gave  Navy  women—or  WAVES,  as  they were popularly called—the same status, responsibilities, and restrictions as men. Use   of   the   term   WAVES   had   begun   when women were given the Reserve classification of W- V(S),    meaning    Women-Volunteer    (Specialist). Since   the   initials   WR   and   the   term   Women’s Reserve were official, some women preferred these terms to the equally official, but less formal, use of WAVES. As  the  Women’s  Reserve  observed  its  second anniversary  on  30  July  1944,  it  could  look  back upon a brief but glowing record of expansion and achievement.  During  its  2  years  of  existence,  the Women’s  Reserve  had  freed  enough  officers  and men  to  crew  a  fleet  of  10  battleships,  10  aircraft carriers, 28 cruisers, and 50 destroyers. In   World   War   II,   WAVES   were   considered directly  eligible  for  34  different  ratings  and  were performing  nearly  every  conceivable  type  of  duty at 500 naval shore establishments. Since   the   WAVES   had   proved   their   worth during the war, the Navy was reluctant to give up its   programs   for   women.   A   number   of   Navy women were retained in service; but by the fourth anniversary  of  the  program,  only  9,800  remained on active duty. The  Women’s  Armed  Services  Integration  Act, Public   Law   625,   marked   the   most   significant milestone  to  that  date  in  the  history  of  women service  members.  This  act,  passed  by  the  Senate and  the  House  and  signed  by  President  Truman on 12 June 1948, gave women full partnership on the   Navy   team.   The    Women’s    Reserve    was abolished and, for the first time, women became a part of the Regular Navy. In  February  1976  the  Navy  promoted  Fran McKee  (fig.  2-19)  to  rear  admiral.  She  made  her mark   in   naval   history   as    the    first    woman unrestricted  line  officer  to  be  selected  for  flag rank. 134.215 Figure 2-19.-Rear Admiral Fran McKee is the first woman unrestricted line officer promoted to flag rank in the U.S. Navy. At the same time the Regular  Navy  opened  to women,  the  Reserve  established  a  program  for women service members. The new laws abolished the Women’s Reserve and authorized the transfer of  all  members  to  appropriate  components  of  the permanent Naval Reserve. SUMMARY All of  the  men,  women,  ships,  and  battles  you have just studied were of value to our Navy. They have all created traditions and set examples for us to follow. Although we may never have the chance to  create  history  of  the  magnitude  they  did,  we still hold fast to the same principles and goals they sought. Our Navy is steeped with tradition. Many present-day   Navy    policies    have    carried    over through   years   of   tradition.   This   chapter   is   a tribute  to  the  many  great  tradition  makers  who have served before us. 2-31

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