Quantcast Sea Chanties

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Sea Chanties
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Summary - 12966_235
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Chapter 12 Components of the Navy
Military   Requirements   for   Petty   Officer   Third Class, NAVEDTRA  12044,  Naval  Education and Training Program Management Support Activity,  Pensacola,  Fla.,  1991. Military   Requirements   for   Senior   and   Master Chief  Petty  Officer,  NAVEDTRA   12048, Naval  Education  and  Training  Program Management   Support   Activity,   Pensacola, Fla.,  1991. United States Department of Defense,  Functions of  the  Department  of  Defense  and  Its  Major Components,  DoD  Directive  5100.1,  Office  of the  Secretary  of  Defense,  Washington,  D.C., 1987. The United States Government Manual 1989/90, Office   of   the   Federal   Register,   National Archives and Records Administration, Wash- ington,   D.C.,   1989. SUGGESTED  READING Mack,  W.P.,  and  T.D.  Paulsen,   The   Naval Officer’s  Guide,  9th  ed.,  Naval  Institute  Press, Annapolis,   Md.,   1983. U.S.  Department  of  Defense,  The  Armed  Forces Officer,   DoD   GEN-36A,   American   Forces Information   Services,   Washington,   D.C., 1988. SEA   CHANTIES SEA CHANTIES WERE SONGS SUNG IN THE DAYS OF SAIL BY CREWS AS THEY WORKED AT HEAVING THE LINES OR TURNING THE CAPSTAN. THE SONGS’ RHYTHMS CAUSED EVERYONE TO PUSH OR PULL SIMULTANEOUSLY, HENCE CAUSING A CONCERTED EFFORT AND BETTER RESULTS. SOME  BELIEVE  THE  TERM  IS  A  DERIVATION  OF  THE  FRENCH  WORD “CHANTER” WHICH MEANS “TO SING. ” OTHERS  MAINTAIN  THE  SPELLING SHOULD  BE    “SHANTIES,”    CLAIMING  THE  NAME  REFERS  TO  THE  SHANTIES ALONG THE MOBILE,    ALA.  WATERFRONT  WHERE  MANY  OF  THE  TUNES  WERE LEARNED  BY  SAILORS. WHATEVER  THE  ORIGIN,    CHANTIES  WERE  DIVIDED  INTO  THREE  DISTINCT CLASSES. SHORT-DRAG   CHANTIES,    USED WHEN A FEW STRONG PULLS WERE NEEDED;  LONG-DRAG  CHANTIES, LONGER SONGS TO SPEED THE WORK OF LONG-HAUL JOBS;    AND HEAVING CHANTIES,    USED FOR JOBS REQURING CONTINUOUS  ACTION  SUCH  AS  TURNING  THE  CAPSTAN. ONE  MAN,    THE  CHANTY-MAN,    STOOD  HIGH  ABOVE  THE  WORKING  CREW  AND SANG THE MAIN LINES WHILE THE REST OF THE CREW ADDED THEIR VOICES  STRONGLY  ON  THE  SECOND  LINE. ON THE LAST WORD, A COM- BINED  PULL  MADE  THE  ROPES  “COME  HOME.” A  GOOD  CHANTY-MAN  WAS  HIGHLY  PRIZED  BY  OFFICERS  AND  CREW  ALIKE. ALTHOUGH HE HAD NO OFFICIAL TITLE OR RATE, HE WAS USUALLY RELIEVED OF ALL DUTIES TO COMPOSE NEW VERSES FOR SEA CHANTIES. 11-18

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.