Quantcast Security -Continued

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Security -Continued
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Judge Advocate General's Corps -Continued
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Naval Intelligence
Classified information takes several forms. It includes  paper  documents,  automatic  data  pro- cessing  (ADP)  storage  media,  telephone  con- versations, microforms, circuit   boards   in equipment,  and  hardware  configuration  briefing charts.   Regardless   of   the   form,   however,   the President  directs  that  official  information  shall be  classified  if  its  unauthorized  disclosure  can reasonably  be  expected  to  cause  damage  to  the national security. The  Navy’s  objective  of  protecting  classified information  requires  several  actions.  Of  these actions,  the  following  are  some  of  the  most important: Clearing military and civilian personnel for access to classified information (personnel security) Ensuring that people know security rules (security  education  and  training) Identifying  what  specific  information  must be  classified  (classification  management) Notifying  users  how  to  protect  classified information   (marking) Keeping  track  of  classified  information (accounting  and  control) •  Preventing    unauthorized    access    to classified  information  (physical  security) •  Providing  a  secure  environment  for electronic  processing  of  classified  informa- tion and data (ADP security) Information  that  requires  protection  in  the interest  of  national  security  is  classified  into  three categories. These categories, in descending order of  importance, are   Top   Secret,   Secret,   or Confidential.   A   Top   Secret   classification   is applied  to  information  that,  after  unauthorized disclosure,   could   be   expected   to   cause   excep- tionally  grave  damage  to  the  national  security. Secret  applies  to  information  that  could  cause serious  damage  to  the  national  security.  Confi- dential   applies   to   that   which   could   cause identifiable  damage. Official  information  and  data  generated  and used by the Navy are released to the public in large quantities.  Classified  Navy  information,  however, must undergo careful screening to be declassified or  to  have  sensitive  portions  removed  before  it can be considered for such release. The President has determined that designated Navy officials may classify  information  only  if  it  falls  under  one  of 10 categories: 1.  Military  plans,  weapons,  or  operations (e.g.,   Navy   plans   to   help   rescue   U.S. citizens  captured  by  terrorists) 2. Vulnerabilities or capabilities of systems, installations,  projects,  or  plans  relating  to the national security (e.g., the range of a new missile) 3.   Foreign   government   information   (e.g., Canadian secrets shared with the United States with the understanding that they will  be  protected) 4.  Intelligence  activities  (including  special activities)  or  intelligence  sources  or methods  (e.g.,  explanation  of  classified satellite photographs of Soviet weapons) 5.  Foreign  relations  or  foreign  activities  of the  United  States  (e.g.,  U.S.  policy  for dealing with Soviet requests to purchase grain while arms negotiations are under way) 6.   Scientific,   technological,   or   economic matters relating to the national security (e.g.,  research  on  certain  aspects  of  the strategic defense initiative) 7.  United  States  government  programs  for safeguarding nuclear materials or facilities (e.g.,  not  revealing  information  as  to whether or not a ship is carrying nuclear weapons  when  it  visits  foreign  ports) 8.  Cryptology  (e.g.,  machines  and  systems for protecting United States communica- tions  from  being  compromised) 9.   Confidential   source   (e.g.,   names   of foreign newsmen who give us secret Soviet plans for the evacuation of Afghanistan) 10. Other information related to the national security that requires protection against unauthorized  disclosure  as  determined  by a  Navy  original  classification  authority Foreign espionage against the United States is a serious and growing concern of the Secretary of the Navy, the Chief of Naval Operations, and the Commandant of the Marine Corps. Combatt- ing   it   requires   informed,   constant,   and   alert attention  to  procedures  for  safeguarding  classified information  by  the  active  cooperation  of  every member  of  the  Navy.  The  agents  of  hostile governments  and  terrorists  groups  have  amply demonstrated  their  danger  to  the  security  and 13-9

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.