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Watch, Qaurter, and Station Bill
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Chapter 17 Ship Design and Engineering
Engineer’s Bell Book The  engineer’s  bell  book  is  a  chronological record  of  orders  pertaining  to  the  speed  of  the engines.  The  book  contains  a  record  of  orders affecting each shaft. It shows the time of receipt of each order to change the propeller speed, the meaning  of  the  order,  and  the  revolutions  per minute resulting from action taken in obedience to  that  order. SUMMARY The  structure  of  our  shipboard  organization allows  ships  to  operate  safely  and  effectively. Seldom  do  ships  operate  in  exactly  the  same manner,  but  all  classes  of  ships  have  the  same basic  organization.    As  new  ships  and  new technologies  are  developed,  our  organizational structure   will   be   adjusted   to   operate   them efficiently. One thing that will never change, however, is the  chain  of  command.  Someone  will  always  be ultimately  responsible  for  the  operation  of  the ship: the commanding officer. Likewise, someone will always be assigned to assist the commanding officer:  the  executive  officer.  Department  heads and  division  officers  will  also  be  assigned  areas of  responsibility. LOG While  names  and  titles  may  change,  the function of the chain of command will remain the same  on  naval  ships.  It  will  continue  to  ensure organization  aboard  the  ship,  which  contributes to  the  accomplishment  of  its  mission. REFERENCES Standard  Organization  and  Regulations  of  the U.S.   Navy, OPNAVINST   3120.32B, Department  of  the  Navy,  Office  of  the  Chief of  Naval  Operations,  Washington,  D.C., 1986. SUGGESTED  READING Lee,   David   M.,   J.M.   Brown,   R.   Morabito, H.S.   Colenda,   Watch   Officer’s   Guide, 12th  ed.,  Naval  Institute  Press,  Annapolis, Md.,   1986. Mack,  W.P.,  and  T.D.  Paulsen,   The   Naval Officer’s Guide, 9th ed., Naval Institute Press, Annapolis,   Md.,   1983. Noel,  J.V.,   Division  Officer’s  Guide,   8th  ed., Naval  Institute  Press,  Annapolis,  Md.,  1986. BOOK TODAY  ANY  BOUND  RECORD  KEPT  ON  A  DAILY  BASIS  ABOARD SHIP   IS   CALLED   A   “LOG.”    ORIGINALLY,  RECORDS  WERE  KEPT  ON THE   SAILING   SHIPS   BY   INSCRIBING   INFORMATION   ONTO SHINGLES  CUT  FROM  LOGS  AND  HINGED  SO  THEY  OPENED  LIKE BOOKS. WHEN  PAPER  BECAME  MORE  READILY  AVAILABLE,  “LOG BOOKS”  WERE  MANUFACTURED  FROM  PAPER  AND  BOUND. SHINGLES WERE RELEGATED TO NAVAL MUSEUMS-BUT THE SLANG TERM STUCK. 16-7

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