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Chapter 2 Makers of Naval Tradition
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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John Paul Jones
resourcefulness of the small American navy and other   Yankee   mariners   enabled   General Washington  to  makeup  for  this  lack.  The  Royal Navy’s   low   state   of   efficiency   at   that   time contributed   to   the   Americans’ ability   to compensate. France,   sympathetic   with   the   rebellious colonies,  entered  the  war  on  our  side  in  1778. Spain  and  Holland  soon  followed.  The  powerful French forces attacked British possessions in every part of the world. As a result, Britain’s internal struggle  against  its  colonies  transformed  into  a world  war  that  involved  all  the  great  maritime powers.  The  West  Indies  became  the  chief  theater of naval activity, where British interests clashed with  those  of  its  enemies—France,  Spain,  and Holland. The  Continental  navy  that  fought  America’s war   for   independence   was   small   and   weak compared with the hundreds of ships of the Royal Navy.  Since  fighting  had  already  begun  before  the small  navy  was  officially  authorized,  it  was handicapped   from   the   beginning.   Converted merchantmen made up two-thirds of the ships of this makeshift force. The crews were drawn from merchant  vessels,  fishing  craft,  and  even  from  the army. The country also had state navies, but they were made up of small vessels designed for river and   harbor   defense.   Swarms   of   American privateers  (privately  owned  craft  outfitted  for  war) also  engaged  in  the  fight  against  the  British. The  multiple  forces  involved  made  coordinating fleet  and  squadron  maneuvers  difficult.  The men  leading  these  forces  helped  to  overcome great  obstacles.  Some  of  these  men  and  their accomplishments  are  described  in  the  following paragraphs. DAVID  BUSHNELL For almost 4 years, a young American named David   Bushnell   worked   on   the   design   of   a Figure 2-1.-The first submarine. 2-2

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