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Mind Your Ps and Qs
109.16 Figure 10-3.-The U.S. Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island. was appointed as the first  president  of  the  Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island (fig. 10-3). Lute’s  conception  of  the  nature  and  needs  of the naval profession shaped the War College from its  start.  He  appreciated  the  interrelationship  of naval power, technology, and international politics and the need for senior officers to understand such complex issues. Lute organized the War College as a place of original research on all questions about war, the statesmanship connected with war, or the prevention of war. Lute’s original format has carried through over the years. Over the last 100 years, the Naval War College has shaped its educational requirements to meet the professional and environmental needs of the Navy. SUMMARY We  live  in  a  volatile  and  complex  world  in which  sudden  and  unexpected  changes  in  world leadership frequently occur. In addition, technological    innovations    frequently    occur    in computer    science,    artificial    intelligence,    and robotics, The Navy must have the ability to apply new  technologies  and  to  respond  quickly  to  new challenges. The Navy must also be able to develop sound   national   and    international    policy    and efficiently manage  its  limited  resources.  In  short, it  must  be  able  to  convert  invention  into  combat readiness. This requires an educated officer corps with   the   intellect   and   vision   to   capitalize   on evolving    technology    and    developments.    The various naval educational institutions discussed in this   chapter   help   to   provide   the   trained   and educated professionals required to fill these needs. REFERENCES Navy Fact File, 8th ed., Office of Information, Washington, D.C., 1988. “Paths to a Commission,” All Hands, Number 863 (February 1989): 42-47. The United States Government Manual 1989/90, Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Administration, Wash- ington, D.C., 1989. 10-12

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