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The Department of Defense (DOD)
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Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
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Joint Chief of Staff (JCS)
seeks    to    maintain    this    stability    through    a combination  of  specific,  equitable,  and  verifiable arms-control agreements. The   focus   on   relations   between   the   United States and the Soviet Union is necessary because both  nations  are  the  greatest  military  powers  in the  world  today.  For  the  foreseeable  future,  the two   countries   will   continue   to   cooperate   and compete.  The  precise  mixture  of  cooperation  and competition  will  depend  on  the  place,  the  issue, and how each sees its own  national interests in a particular case. The   Soviets   appear   willing   to   strike   some bargains  that  can  reduce  the  chances  of  mutual destruction.   At   the   same   time,   because   their interests  and  objectives  are  different  from  ours, tensions have risen in  the  past  and  will  continue to do so in the future. The unique qualities of each leg of the TRIAD combined  provide  a  level  of  flexibility  that  could not  be  attained  by  each  one  alone.  The  TRIAD enhances our employment options, complicates the Soviet’s hedge against possible Soviet violations of arms-control  limitations,  and  reduces  the  impact of new technological advances. U.S. NAVY’S ROLE Deterrence of war has been the sole mission of and  fundamental  reason  for  the  existence  of  the fleet  ballistic  missile  submarine  (SSBN)  since  its inception   in   1960.   The   SSBN   program   is   the Navy’s  highest  priority.  It  is  an  essential  corner- stone  of  the  national  security  policy,  functioning as a survivable and dependable leg of the strategic deterrent   TRIAD.   The   submarine   leg   of   the TRIAD   consists   of   older   SSBNs   armed   with Poseidon  C-3  or  Trident  C-4  missiles  and  new Trident submarines carrying Trident C-4 and D-5 missiles.    These    submarines    spend    about    55 percent  of  their  time  at  sea,  with  their  missiles targeted at sites in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.   Tridents   carry   24   submarine-launched ballistic  missiles  (SLBMs)  compared  with  16  in earlier submarines. U.S. AIR FORCE’S ROLE Our land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles  (ICBMs)  are  unsurpassed  in  readiness and  immediate  reaction  capability.  They  can  be launched quickly, and they have a high capability of survival. The Strategic Air Command’s  (SAC’s) ICBM  force  consists  of  Minuteman  missiles  and Titan II missiles, which are being retired. SAC  is modernizing     its     missile forces with new Peacekeeper ICBMs, which are being deployed  in Minuteman    silos.    The    Peacekeeper    is    more accurate,  carries  more  warheads,  and  places  at risk the most difficult Soviet targets. SAC’s  manned  bombers  are  the  most  flexible element of the TRIAD. They are the only leg of the TRIAD that can be recalled and  reused.  Bombers can  be  used  as  a  manned  penetration  or  as  a cruise  missile  launch  platform.  Bombers  can  also be used in support of conventional operations. SAC can  use  B-52  and  FB-111  bombers  to  penetrate Soviet defenses. New B-1B bombers (fig. 11-2) are being placed into service to modernize SAC’s aging B-52 forces. 134.131 Figure 11-2.-U.S. Air Force B-1B bomber. 11-5

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