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Explosives  Development  Engineering  Department (NEDED)   at   the   Naval   Weapons   Station, Yorktown,   Virginia,   and   the   Naval   Ordnance Station  at  Indian  Head,  Maryland. UNDERWATER   WEAPONS   AND UNDERWATER  WEAPONS  SYSTEMS The Navy’s main research, development, test, and  evaluation  activity  for  underwater  combat systems  is  the  Naval  Underwater  Systems  Center (NUSC)   at   Newport,   Rhode   Island.   NUSC   is committed to a diversity of complex technological research  programs  concerning  command  and control  systems,  underwater  weapons  and  targets, weapons launchers and tubes, underwater track- ing  ranges,  sonar,  surveillance,  ocean  engineering, and  fleet  readiness.  In  addition  to  its  Newport facilities,   NUSC   has   a   major   research   and development laboratory complex at New London, Connecticut. NUSC   is   tasked   to   perform   research   and development of torpedo-type weapons. However, the  Naval  Undersea  Warfare  Engineering  Station (NUWES) at Keyport, Washington, also conducts some research and development and considerable testing and evaluation of torpedoes. In addition, NUWES,  Keyport,  serves  as  the  sole  proofing activity   for   production   torpedoes.   Proofing includes   a   series   of   tests   that   a   sample   of production   torpedoes   must   pass   before   the torpedoes are accepted and delivered to the fleet. SHIPBOARD  PERSONNEL PROTECTION Wearing the right protective equipment is the best   way   for   personnel   to   prevent   injuries. Protective   equipment   protects   personnel   from weapons   effects   in   hostile   actions;   from   fire, smoke,  and  toxic  effects  in  peacetime  accidents; and  from  hazardous  and  environmental  effects in the day-to-day workplace. Since the crew must be  able  to  function  under  all  three  of  these environmental  conditions,  wearing  protective equipment  limits  their  exposure. The  following  are  some  items  of  protective equipment   that   have   been,   or   are   being, developed: The naval battle helmet, the ballistic face shield, the naval flak vest, and laser eye protection for  wear  during  hostile  actions The  fire  fighter’s  helmet,  antiflash  and antiexposure  clothing,  fire-retardant  working clothing,  and  fire  fighter’s  breathing  apparatus for  protection  in  peacetime  accidents The  auto-inflatable  utility  life  preserver and improved clothing for both cold weather and hazardous   material   handling   for   protection against the hazardous and environmental effects in  the  workplace SUMMARY NAVAL  AIRCRAFT  SYSTEMS The principal field activity for the design and cradle-to-grave  management  of  the  aircraft  system is the Naval Air Development Center (NADC) at Warminster,  Pennsylvania.  The  center  conducts research,  development,  test,  and  evaluation  of, and  life  cycle  support  for,  major  naval  aircraft systems.   NADC   was   established   in   1944.   Its capabilities were expanded substantially in 1973 when  the  Naval  Navigation  Laboratory  (NNL), formerly  the  Naval  Strategic  Systems  Naviga- tion   Facility,   was   incorporated   under   NADC. Approximately  60  percent  of  the  research  and development  at  NNL  deals  with  navigation  for surface  ships  and  submarines.  The  other  40 percent is concentrated on airborne navigational systems.  NNL’s  current  and  ongoing  research  and development   projects   include   ring   laser   gyro technology,  the  global  positioning  system,  and  the joint  tactical  information  distribution  system. All  the  supporting  elements  of  the  Navy discussed  in  this  chapter  share  a  common thread—they all work to provide support to Navy personnel  and  programs. The   Civil   Engineer   Corps   oversees   the construction  of  our  bases  and  facilities.  The Supply   Corps   provides   parts,   equipment,   and food  and  disburses  our  pay  and  allowances. BUMED strives to keep us healthy or return us to  health  if  we  are  ill  or  injured.  The  Chaplain Corps attends to our spiritual and moral needs. The  Judge  Advocate  General’s  Corps  helps  us with   our   legal   problems.   The   Naval   Security Program   helps   to   prevent   the   unauthorized disclosure   of   our   vital   information.   Naval Intelligence  provides  us  with  information  about potential  threats  or  enemies.  And  last  but  not least, the Research and Development Program of the  Navy  continues  to  develop  and  improve  our equipment. 13-13

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