Quantcast United States Naval Academy -Continued - 12966_207

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: United States Naval Academy -Continued
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
United States Naval Academy -Continued - 12966_206
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
An Aerial View of the U.S. Naval Academy
Nelson,  not  understanding  a  word  of  the question,  replied  with  one  of  his  memorized phrases,  “Thank  You,  I  am  very  well.  ” The   startled   Professor   glared   at   him   and continued, “What course have you just finished?” ‘‘I  am  24  years  of  age,”  replied  Nelson. One  of  the  commodores  present  during  the examination was Commodore Matthew C. Perry, who did not understand a word of French. As the situation reached an impasse, Commodore Perry arose from his seat and congratulated Girault on his success in teaching the midshipman to speak French  with  such  fluency  and  accuracy. Initially  the  course  of  study  at  the  Academy took  5  years.  Of  these,  midshipmen  spent  only the  first  and  last  at  Annapolis;  they  spent  the intervening 3 years at sea. During 1850 and 1851 the  school  was  reorganized  as  the  U.S.  Naval Academy,  and  the  course  of  study  was  changed to  4  consecutive  years.  Summer  practice  cruises replaced  the  omitted  sea  service.  Thus,  today’s basic 4-year curriculum first appeared at the Naval Academy  over  100  years  ago,  long  before  it became  general  practice  in  American  under- graduate  education. With   the   reorganization   that   changed   the Naval School to the Naval Academy, the school’s executive  officer  became  the  commandant  of midshipmen.  The  school  also  adopted  a  naval uniform for acting midshipmen and inaugurated the  marking  scale  of  4.0. The   reorganization   also   provided   that   the holder of a certificate of graduation was entitled to a midshipman’s warrant. After 2 years of sea duty,  the  midshipman  could  return  for  an examination for lieutenant. Only Naval Academy graduates were to receive the warrants—the first step toward regulating the quality and quantity of  officers  in  the  fleet. In  1851  the  method  of  appointing  midshipmen in  proportion  to  the  members  of  the  House  of Representatives   was   established.   In   1852   the proviso requiring an Academy aspirant to receive the   recommendation   of   his   Congressman   was added. In 1855 the original “fourth class” entered the academy. Almost simultaneously the "my plebe" tradition developed. With this tradition the new third  classmen  selected  particular  members  of  the incoming  class  over  whom  they  kept  a  watchful eye.  This  eventually  became  a  first  classman privilege.  Until  the  advent  of  the  squad  system in  1965,  the  closest  relationship  at  the  Naval Academy was between the first classmen and the plebes. Attrition  during  the  early  years  was  heavy. Only  269  midshipmen  of  the  first  1,209  completed the course of study. George Dewey entered with a  class  of  75;  after  their  annual  examination  in June 1855, only 38 were retained. Of these, the future  hero  of  Manila  Bay  ranked  35th!  At graduation, however, he ranked fifth in his class of  15. The  1850s  also  saw  two  other  firsts  at  the Academy. Franklin   Pierce   became   the   first President   of   the   United   States   to   visit   the Academy when he attended a naval ball therein 1856.  Two  years  later  the  school’s  first  literary society was formed. It honored James Lawrence, whose  words,  "Don’t  give  up  the  ship!"  adorn Memorial   Hall. The  coming  of  the  Civil  War  brought  the young  school  trying  years  in  1860  and  1861.  As states   seceded   from   the   Union,   the   tension mounted. Finally, one day in April 1861, all hands were ordered to muster aboard the  Constitution, the  school  ship.  Lieutenant  Christopher  R.  P. Rogers,  commandant  of  midshipmen,  addressed the  group  and  ordered  all  those  who  desired  to resign  to  fall  out  of  ranks.  Many  did  and,  amid sad  farewells,  went  off  to  join  the  Confederacy. Officers  at  the  Academy  also  went  their respective  ways,  including  the  brothers  William and  Foxhall  Parker.  William  had  argued  they should   remain   with   the   Union   because   of education   and   Navy   ties;   Foxhall   argued   for the   Confederacy   because   of   family   and   state connections.  They  separated  after  their  discussion; but each had been so persuasive that, unknown to  each  other,  William  resigned  and  Foxhall remained  with  the  Union. The  rapidly  expanding  Union  Navy  urgently needed   junior   officers.   Therefore,   the   first, second,  and  third  class  midshipmen  who  remained at the Academy were sent off to war. Shortly there- after  the  fourth  class,  aboard  the  Constitution, sailed for Newport, Rhode Island, which became the home of the Academy for the duration of the War. Organized  athletics  were  introduced  to  the Academy   during   the   post-Civil   War   period. In  1867  the  Academy  formed  class  baseball teams  and  held  the  first  of  a  series  of  annual Thanksgiving  athletic  carnivals.  The  athletic program  included  track  and  field  competition, baseball,  rowing,  and  gymnastics.  In  1870  the Academy began competing against outside crews in   rowing.   Football   was   being   played   at   the Academy by 1880; and in 1882 the school’s foot- ball team played its first outside game, defeating 10-3

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.