Quantcast World War I - 12966_14

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: World War I
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Sea Power in Modern Times
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
World War II -Continued
ordnance  and  gunnery,  was  instrumental  in equipping   the   all-steel   Navy   with   improved weapons  systems.  Against  strong  protests  from the  Navy,  Dahlgren  demanded  improved  weap- ons.  He  designed  a  new,  reinforced  gun  breech; advocated  the  first  real  sights;  and  urged  the rifling  of  cannons. One of the reasons the Navy expanded during this  period  was  President  Theodore  Roosevelt’s enthusiasm for a strong Navy. A large Navy gave Roosevelt the opportunity to carry out his policy of  “speak  softly  and  carry  a  big  stick.” WORLD  WAR  II SIGNIFICANT   DATES 1 Sep. 1939 31 Oct. 1941 7  Dec.  1941 WORLD  WAR  I SIGNIFICANT   DATES 1 May 1915 6  Apr.  1917 11  Nov.  1918 SS Gulfight  torpedoed  by  Ger- man  submarine.  First  American merchantman  sunk  by  sub- marine  in  World  War  1. United  States  declares  war against Germany. Navy strength at  4,376  officer  and  69,680 enlisted.  United  States  seizes and  interns  German  ships  in American   ports. World  War  I  ends. World War I involved a struggle between the predominance of land power versus naval power. Germany’s  leaders  should  have  recognized  that the British navy, rather than the French army, was Germany’s principal barrier to success. A correct appraisal of this situation as early as 1905, when Germany   began   an   earnest   buildup   of   naval strength, might have resulted in a reallocation of Germany’s  war-making  resources.  Such  action could have provided Germany with a navy strong enough  to  defeat  the  British  navy.  As  it  was, Germany’s   leaders   believed   in   land   power. Therefore,  the  Imperial  army  was  the  favored service—a  fact  that  caused  Admiral  von  Tirpitz to lament, “We Germans do not understand the sea!”  Too  late,  Germany  recognized  the  U-boat force,  a  powerful  flotilla  of  submarines,  as  its deadliest   offensive   weapon.   Although   the measures taken by von Trpitz to expand the naval arm  of  the  German  navy  were  extensive,  his efforts  were  never  quite  enough. 8 Dec. 1941 4  May  1942 4  Jun.  1942 6  Jun.  1944 23  Oct.  1944 9 May 1945 6  Aug.  1945 2 Sep. 1945 World  War  II  begins  as  German troops  invade  Poland. USS Reuben James is  torpedoed and  sunk  by  German  submarine off  Iceland;  about  100  sailors killed.   This   is   the   first   U.S. naval vessel to be lost by enemy action  in  World  War  II. Japanese attack Pearl Harbor; President  orders  mobilization  of U.S.  forces. United  States  declares  war  on Japan. Battle of Coral Sea takes place; this  is  the  first  carrier-versus- carrier engagement and the first battle   in   modern   history   in which   opposing   ships   do   not exchange  shots;  all  damage  is inflicted  by  aircraft. Battle   of   Midway   (4-6   June) begins;   this   battle   is   turning point  of  war. Allied   Expeditionary   Force invades Western Europe. Land- ings are made on the beaches of Normandy. Battle of Leyte Gulf takes place. V-E   Day   occurs   as   Germany surrenders   unconditionally   to Western  Allies  and  the  Soviet Union. First  atomic  bomb  is  dropped on  Hiroshima,  Japan. World  War  II  ends. During World War II the Germans once again demonstrated  shortsightedness  and  the  incapacity to  make  the  best  use  of  their  resources  in  sea power.  Again,  they  failed  to  plan  for  control  of the sea by building an adequate number of ships. 1-6

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.