Quantcast World War II

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: World War II
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
O.K. Ingram
Up
Naval Orientation - Military manual for administrative purposes
Next
Chester William Nimitz
sending  out  distress  signals.  The  ship  was  sinking rapidly;  but  Ausburne,  disregarding  his  own safety,  stuck  to  his  post  to  the  end,  vainly attempting  to  obtain  help.  Ausburne’s  sacrifice, like  Ingram’s,  was  in  keeping  with  the  highest traditions  of  naval  service.  The  heroism  of  such men reminds us that the bluejackets are worthy of  the  best  in  leadership. WORLD  WAR  II SIGNIFICANT   DATES 16  Oct.  1940 Registration  under  the  Selective Service  and  Training  Act  begins; 16 million register. 7 Dec. 1941 Japanese  attack  Pearl  Harbor. 20 Dec. 1941 Admiral  E.  J.  King  assumes duties as Commander in Chief, U.S.  Fleet. 18 Jun. 1942 First  black  officer,  Bernard  W. Robinson, commissioned   in Naval  Reserve. Deeds of yesterday furnish the inspiration for today. In warfare the immediate stakes are death and  life,  and  the  long-term  stakes  are  the  survival of a way of life and of a civilization. During such crises  people  must  work  beyond  their  strength  and hit harder and faster than their opponents. They must  make  split-second—and  correct—decisions and risk their own lives to let others live. Their heroism  lives  on  in  traditions  that  become  the motivating force of future generations: traditions of courage, hard work, lightning fast and shrewd judgment,   and   heroic   self-sacrifice.   The   many Navy  members  that  responded  to  such  crises during  World  War  II  reinforced  these  valued naval traditions. CHESTER  WILLIAM  NIMITZ Admiral  Chester  William  Nimitz  hoisted  his flag  as  Commander-in-Chief,  U.S.  Pacific  Fleet (CINCPAC),  on  31  December  1941  aboard  the submarine Grayling in a harbor littered with the wreckage of American warships. Admiral Nimitz (fig. 2-13) was faced with one of the most difficult tasks  ever  presented.  The  Japanese,  on  7 December 1941, successfully rendered one of the most  damaging  air  raids  in  history.  Of  eight battleships   in   Pearl   Harbor,   Arizona  w as wrecked,  Oklahoma   capsized,   and   six   were damaged—three  of  which  were  resting  on  the bottom. All totaled, 19 American ships were hit. The  Japanese  practically  eliminated  the  Navy’s air-striking  power  by  knocking  out  150  of  202 planes.  The  Navy  and  Marine  Corps  suffered 2,117  dead  plus  779  wounded. Despite a tragic shortage of ships, aircraft, and supplies,  Admiral  Nimitz  organized  his  remaining forces to carry on defensive warfare. He tried to delay the enemy’s advance until we could muster sufficient strength to put up any real resistance. As   rapidly   as   ships,   personnel,   and   material became   available,   however,   he   shifted   to   the offensive. His brilliant leadership and outstanding skill as a strategist enabled units under his command to  defeat  the  enemy  in  the  Coral  Sea,  off Midway, and in the Solomons. His strategy also enabled  forces  to  conduct  offensive  raids  on Japanese-held  territories,  such  as  the  Gilbert  and Marshall  Islands.  The  first  decisive  defeat  suffered by the Japanese navy in 350 years was achieved by forces under Admiral Nimitz’ command during the Battle of Midway. It put an end to the long period of Japanese offensive action and restored the  balance  of  naval  power  in  the  Pacific. Gradually,  Admiral  Nimitz’  forces  fought their   way   across   the   Pacific   to   the   Japanese mainland. Initiating the final phase in the battle for  victory,  Admiral  Nimitz  launched  an  attack against  the  Marianas.  His  forces  inflicted  a decisive defeat in the Battle of the Philippine Sea and  captured  Guam  and  Tinian.  Continuing onward,  his  forces  isolated  enemy-held  bastions (the strategy of island hopping) in the Central and Eastern  Carolines.  An  engagement  with  Japanese task forces then resulted in a historic victory in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. His long-range strategy peaked  as  his  forces  launched  amphibious  assaults on  Iwo  Jima  and  Okinawa. Finally, Nimitz placed U.S. Navy forces in the harbor of Tokyo, which resulted in the surrender of the Japanese Imperial government. The formal surrender document was signed on 2 September 1945  aboard  the  battleship  Missouri  in Tokyo Bay 2-17

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.