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Useful Information for Newly Commissioned Officers
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Example Orders
CHAPTER  2 YOUR  ORDERS  TO  DUTY Sometime before graduation you should receive orders to your first tour of duty.   Orders come from the Chief of Naval Personnel (CHNAVPERS).   You will receive an original set of your orders and many copies. (Save  these  copies;  you  will  need  them when  executing  your  orders.)     Study  your  orders carefully   to   be   sure   of   their   exact   meaning. In addition   to   the   orders,   you   should   receive   some other   explanatory   material   from   your   local personnel  office,  such  as   travel  instructions  and immunization requirements. DETACHMENT Your orders will be endorsed, showing the date of  their  delivery  to  you  and  the  date  and  time  of your  detachment. When  “detached,”  you  are  on your own until the date you must report to your next station.    Therefore,  before  you  detach,  make  sure you know WHERE you are going, WHEN you must report, and HOW you plan to get there.  Also be sure you  have  in  your  possession  your  service  record, health record, orders, and personal finance record. Before you leave your old command, make sure you  fill  out  a     Notice  of  Change  of  Address  card (OPNAV  5110/5)  to  keep  both  your  old  and  new station advised of your address. Guard  your  orders  and  records.     Do  not  put them in your luggage; carry them with you.   You will need    the    original    of    your    orders    to    obtain transportation, travel advances, and all travel claims. When  you  report  to  your  new  ship  or  station,  your orders  will  be  endorsed  and  placed  in  your  service record. When  you  detach,  ensure  these  endorsed orders are put in your personal file.   You may need to refer to a set of orders years later. I f   f o r   s o m e   r e a s o n   ( a c c i d e n t ,   s i c k n e s s , emergency)  you  become  stranded  during  your  travel, you must inform your new commanding officer.   The nearest  armed  forces  activity,  including  recruiting offices and Reserve units, can help you by endorsing your orders or communicating with your new command or  both.    Refer  to  a  telephone  directory  listing  under “U.S.  Government”  for  the  number  of  the  nearest military activity in your area. MILITARY PERSONNEL IDENTIFICATION NUMBER AND DESIGNATOR The  Navy  uses  Social  Security  numbers  (SSNs) and  designators  to  identify  officer  personnel.     The SSN has nine digits.   The designator has four digits. These   identifying   numbers   will   appear   in   the remarks   section   of   your   orders. For   example: 123-45-6789/1100. Once  assigned,  your  Social  Security  number will  not  change.   Your  designator  may  change  as your qualifications change.   The first three digits of  your  designator  identify  the  general  category within  which  you  perform,  and  the  fourth  digit indicates   your   official   status. For   example,   a designator of 1100 identifies a line officer of the Regular Navy whose permanent grade is ensign or above, while a designator of 1105 identifies a line officer   of   the   Naval   Reserve. The   Register   of Commissioned   and   Warrant   Officers   of   the   Navy, NAVPERS 15018, contains a complete breakdown of all designators. A TYPICAL SET OF ORDERS The   following   example   orders,   issued   by   the Chief of Naval Personnel (CHNAVPERS), are shown in  the  typical  capitalized  format.    (Appendix  II  lists various   terms,   phrases,   and   abbreviations   used   in transfer orders.) 2-1

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