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Saluting Aboard Ship
CHAPTER  5 CUSTOMS  OF  THE  SERVICE Naval  customs  and  traditions  play  a  significant role   in   your   career   as   a   naval   officer. You   are expected   to   pass   on   and   perpetuate   the   more venerated customs and traditions of the Navy.   When Navy   customs   and   traditions   are   appreciated   and properly applied, they produce high ideals and esprit de corps among members of the naval service. NAVAL COURTESY Knowledge  of  military  courtesy  is  important  to everyone in the Navy.   Whether or not you realize it, you   are   practicing   military   courtesy   all   the   time. Knowing  what  to  do  at  the  right  time  can  keep  you from encountering some embarrassing situations. Navy   personnel   who   know   and   practice   naval courtesy   make   good   impressions   and   exude self-assurance that will carry them through otherwise difficult situations.   Furthermore, all members of the naval service observe these evidences of respect and courtesy. The   junior   member   always   takes   the initiative, and the senior member returns the courtesy. THE SALUTE One  of  the  essentials  of  military  courtesy  is  the hand   salute. Regulations   governing   its   use   are founded   on   military   etiquette   deeply   rooted   in traditions  and  customs. Far  from  being  a  servile gesture, the salute is a symbol of respect and a sign of comradeship among service personnel.   The salute is part   of   the   uniform   and   all   that   it   represents. Accordingly, as a standard practice, the junior starts the  salute,  and  the  senior  returns  it. An  admiral returns the salute in the same form in which a seaman gives  it. By  saluting  first,  a  person  demonstrates respect  for  the  senior  rank,  not  inferiority,  to  the person saluted. MANNER OF SALUTING Be   precise   and   military   as   you   salute. The following rules apply to the hand salute: Give hand salutes, and other marks of respect appropriate  to  rank,  to  officers  of  the  armed services of the United States in uniform (and in civilian   clothes,   if   recognized)   and   to high-ranking  dignitaries  of  foreign  nations. Salute the occupant of automobiles that display the flag of a high-ranking dignitary. Keep  your  head  and  eyes  turned  toward  the person  you  are  saluting. Execute  the  hand salute as follows: 1.   Raise your right hand smartly until the tip of your forefinger touches the lower part of your headgear, slightly to the right of your right eye. 2.   Keep your upper arm parallel to the ground. 3.   Keep your thumb and fingers extended and joined with your palm down. 4.   Keep the tip of your middle finger to your elbow in a straight line. 5.   End the salute by dropping your hand down to  your  side  in  one  clean  motion.    Avoid slapping your leg as you do so. Salute  at  a  distance  at  which  recognition  is easy,  normally  within  30  paces.    Salute  when the  person  being  saluted  is  about  six  paces from you or at the nearest point of approach. Hold the salute until the person saluted passes you or returns your salute; then end the salute. Accompany   your   salute   with   one   of   the following greetings: 1.   From   first   rising   until   noon—“Good morning, . . . ” 2.   From noon until sunset—“Good afternoon, . . . ” 3.   From   sunset   until   turning   in—“Good evening, . . .” Salute  only  if  you  are  at  a  halt  or  a  walk.    If running, come to a walk before saluting. If   seated   and   covered,   rise   and   come   to attention before saluting. If you overtake and pass a senior, salute when abreast of the senior and ask, “By your leave, 5-1

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