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Navy Instructor Manual - Military manual for teaching in the military
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Lesson - 134t_64
circuit   television   (CCTV)   system. Since  the  lecture  method  depends  primarily  on  student  listening  and  note-taking  skills  for  the transfer  of  learning,  you  must  have  effective  speaking  skills.  Your  speaking  skills  can  help  you overcome   some   of   the   major   shortcomings   of   no   active   student   participation. In  preparing  to  deliver  a  lecture,  set  clear-cut  goals  and  objectives.  Make  sure  you  have  an in-depth  knowledge  of  the  subject  matter,  and  find  realistic  examples  and  analogies  to  use  with your  explanations.  As  with  any  presentation,  apply  the  laws  of  learning  in  your  preparation  and delivery. Remember,  the  only  feedback  you  will  get  is  the  nonverbal  communications  from  your audience,   if   you   can   see   them.   Since   your   audience   will   quickly   get   bored   with   no   active   part in  the  instruction,  your  lecture  should  last  no  more  than  30  minutes.  Lectures  should  be  short, well  organized,  and  to  the  point. LECTURE   WITH   AUDIOVISUALS A   lecture   with   audiovisuals   includes   visual   and/or   audio   aids.   Navy   training   frequently   uses this  instructional  method  of  presenting  information,  concepts,  and  principles.  As  you  learned in   the   “Principles   of   Learning”   topic,   most   learning   takes   place   through   the   sense   of   sight.   It follows  then  that  all  students  must  be  able  to  see  the  visuals  being  used,  which  will  limit  class size. The  visual  aids  you  use  can  reduce  the  amount  of  explanation  time  required  for  students  to grasp   concepts,   structures,   and   relationships. You   simply   cannot   get   some   ideas   across   to students  without  the  use  of  visual  aids.  For  example,  think  how  difficult  an  explanation  of  the operation  of  the  internal  combustion  engine  would  be  without  the  use  of  visual  aids. When  you  use  the  lecture  with  audiovisuals,  you  must  prepare  properly.  That  includes practicing  with  the  actual  visual  aids  in  the  place  you  will  be  using  them.  Plan  your  timing  of the  use  of  visual  aids  to  keep  the  students’  attention  and  to  stress  important  points.  Since  your explanation  of  the  visual  aids  will  require  you  to  use  effective  instructor  techniques,  decide  which ones   you   will   use.   Then   mentally   rehearse   those   techniques   and   practice   using   the   visual   aids until  you  can  present  your  lecture  smoothly. LESSON The   most   often   used   method   of   classroom   instruction   within   Navy   training   is   the   lesson method.  The  lesson  method  is  interactive  in  nature.  This  method  not  only  includes  audio/visual aids,  it  involves  the  use  of  two-way  communication.  The  lesson  method  involves  exactly  what its  name  implies--teaching  a  lesson;  and  teaching  a  lesson  involves  much  more  than  just presenting  information.  When  using  the  lesson  method,  you  will  follow  a  lesson  plan  written by   curriculum   developers.   You   will   incorporate   questions   into   your   lesson   to   encourage   student thinking  and  check  for  understanding  throughout  the  lesson.  Even  though  you  have  a  lesson plan,   you   must   anticipate   student   questions. That   means   you   must   have   a   thorough 53

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