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Evaluating the Examples
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Navy Customer Service Manual
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Evaluation of Case Number 1
CASE NUMBER 1 MS3 Frost and MSSN Doe come into the Navy at the same time and go through recruit training and A school  together.  Then  they  receive  orders  to  the  same ship. While they remain together during their time in the Navy  and  become  good  friends,  their  attitudes  and ambitions are quite different. MS3 Frost makes his rate the first time up. MSSN Doe takes the test twice and fails  both  times. Suppose we interview the two men and see if we can identify some of their differences. Question: MS3  Frost: MSSN Doe: Question: MS3 Frost: Question: MSSN Doe: Tell us a little about your job. I like my job. Basically, it involves preparing three meals a day, 7 days a week, either at sea or in port. By using the menu to make breakouts, I have a current   knowledge   of   stores remaining  on  board.  This  makes  me feel that I have a part in managing inventory. We use the menu to make breakouts  of  food  items  and  plan  for the  meals  that  follow. It’s a great job! No responsibilities, easy work, my room and board, and I get paid for it. MS3 Frost, you said that you like your job. What is it that you like about it? It would be difficult for me to identify one thing that would stand out over another, but the fact that my rating is interesting and that it provides variety means a lot. I enjoy interacting with the crew; and this job provides mean opportunity  not  only  to  provide  a service, but to talk with each of the crew members. Often this interaction provides  me  knowledge  of  what  they would like to see more of on the line or items they would prefer to see less of. MSSN Doe, you said the job is easy. Is that all it has going for it? I guess so. I haven’t given it much thought. It’s a job. The chief makes out the menu, and tells me what I have to do. I just follow the recipes. Question: MSSN Doe: Question: MS3 Frost: Question: MSSN Doe: MS3 Frost: MSSN  Doe,  you  said  you  have  no responsibilities and implied that you don’t  want  to  have  any.  Do  you consider  responsibility  something  to be  avoided? I do now. The food service officer and the chief are paid more than I am; they should  have  the  responsibility. Do you agree with this, MS3 Frost? It’s true that both the food service officer and the chief are paid more, but   I   feel   they   have   equal responsibility for their pay. I would like  to  assume  as  much  responsibility as the chief will allow me to have so that I may learn as many skills as possible.  I  view  these  skills  as valuable in planning a career either in the military or in the civilian sector. As far as responsibility, I feel that everyone  in  the  food  service  division has a responsibility to the crew to observe  rules  of  sanitation  and  to make  each  meal  nutritious  and  tasty. The food service officer and the chief have the training and experience that qualify  them  for  this,  but  I  have responsibilities  also.  “There  are  many ways to do a job—my responsibility is to do it right. Since the chief prepares the menu, do you really have a choice of what foods you  prepare? Who wants to choose? If the menu calls for meat loaf, they get meat loaf, if it calls for mashed potatoes, they get mashed  potatoes. I’m not in a position to change the menu, but I do have the latitude to use several  recipe  variations.  That prevents  meals  from  becoming monotonous.  Small  things  such  as seasoning   sauces   and   dressed-up leftovers seem to be a big hit with the crew. Because crew size is small, I’m able   to   place   more   emphasis   on serving  those  items  that  are  to  be served  hot  or  cold  at  their  desired temperature. 2-3

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