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Developing the "We" Concept -Continued
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Navy Customer Service Manual
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Making a Personal Inventory -Continued
see that working as a member of a team improves the effectiveness and productivity of the contact point. DEVELOPING  CONFIDENCE Confidence is that quality that enables us to make decisions or to take actions without the constant fear that we might be wrong. It doesn’t rule out mistakes, but we are less likely to make them when our evaluation of facts is not muddled by nagging doubts. Confidence also enables us to face a mistake, admit it, correct it, and then go on to the next job with the assurance that we can handle it. When team members develop confidence in  their  abilities,  they  become  willing  to  help  their teammates as well as the customers. Team members working together is what teamwork is all about. BENEFITING FROM MISTAKES You  benefit  from  incorrect  decisions  and  actions  if you learn how to avoid repeating your mistakes. Many supervisors  recognize  that  when  they  say,  “I  don’t condemn mistakes as long as you don’t continue to make them.”   When   team   members   recognize   the   con- sequences of a mistake, they are less likely to repeat the same mistake. Therefore, a mistake, discovered and corrected, helps to improve teamwork. When an assistant burned out the filament of an experimental  light  bulb  by  applying  too  heavy  a  charge of electricity, Thomas Edison remarked, “Don’t call it a mistake; call it an education.” Adopting this positive attitude enables us to obtain the maximum value—for the customer and for ourselves—from our work. MAKING A PERSONAL INVENTORY Now that you have completed reading this manual, you  probably  have  been  able  to  relate  some  of  the situations to experiences you have had. Have you also tried  to  find  similarities  between  the  attitudes  that  you possess  and  those  shown  in  the  examples  and discussions? The questions that follow have been adapted from the checklist used in chapter 2; use them to make a personal inventory of your skills as a contact point representative: Do I present a good personal appearance at the contact  point? Am I familiar with all the responsibilities of my rating? Am I competent to manage all the responsibilities of  my  current  assignment? 4-12

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