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3.  Acknowledge  their  achievements. Recognizing Ability To  recognize  abilities  is  to  recognize  the  individual. If we were to randomly select a Navy rating and then from that rating select a rate, these people would be as different in their abilities as they are in appearance. Matching  job  requirements  to  individual  abilities  is  just good management. This job match should not be looked upon as being permanent, but as a logical beginning for training. Setting Goals “This instruction just came in. I want you to study it.” This supervisor has given the team members one reason they should read the instruction: “I want. . .” This approach gives them no motivation to read it; they do not know how, why, or when to use the instruction? A  different  approach  would  provide  more  motivation: “We just received this instruction covering new pay procedures that will go into effect the first of the month. I’ll route it around so that all of you can read it. Next week, we will have a training session on the contents.” Using this approach, the supervisor has told them how, why  and  when. Goals must be meaningful and realistic if team members are to consider them seriously. Ideally, goals should be set just above the level that the person is currently achieving. If they are too low, there is no challenge—the  goal  has  already  been  met.  If  they  are too high, the member is likely to reject them. If failure is certain, why go to the trouble of trying? Goals may be set for individuals or for the team. They may be set as a part of, or in connection with, the division  training  program. Acknowledging  Achievements Rare, indeed, is the person who will conscientiously do  a  job,  day  after  day,  without  some  recognition. Members normally receive recognition for performance at  the  outstanding  performance  level.  However,  those who  perform  considerably  below  the  level  of outstanding  also  need  to  receive  recognition.  Make  an effort to recognize those personnel who perform at a less notable  level.  The  following  are  some  examples  of  the positive  effects  of  such  recognition: The new member is just learning the job. Recog- nition  of  achievement  may  provide  a  needed boost  toward  increased  ability. 4-7

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