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Types of Boats
CHAPTER 5 BOAT SEAMANSHIP The Navy uses thousands of boats, ranging in size from dinghies to landing craft. These boats are powered by diesels and by outboard motors. Most of them are built of steel, aluminum, or fiber glass. The term boat refers to small craft that are limited in use by their size. Usually,  they  are  not  capable  of  making  regular, independent  voyages  of  any  length  on  the  high  seas. This chapter is important because you, very early in your career, may be assigned as a member of a boat crew and later on as a coxswain. To assume the duties of a coxswain, you must know the  following: Who is responsible for each task What the duties of other crew members are, and be able to carry them out in an emergency The purpose of each piece of boat equipment How to read signal flags, so you can return to your ship if recalled Small  boats  carried  aboard  a  ship,  which  are lowered  to  perform  various  tasks,  are  known  as  the ship's boats. The distinction between a ship and a boat is largely one of size; boats are carried by ships. Boat   seamanship   encompasses   more   than   a knowledge  of  the  kinds  of  boats  in  operation  in  the  Navy. Since boat crews are responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of their craft, they must receive training in a number of other areas. Some of the techniques to be mastered require considerable practice and experience before a boat crew member  can  become  accomplished  in  this  work. Included  in  these  skills  are  the  following: Hoisting, lowering, and securing methods Operating  boats  properly  under  all  conditions, including a knowledge of the Rules of the Road Knowledge of buoy systems Boat etiquette NOMENCLATURE  OF  BOATS LEARNING   OBJECTIVES:   Define   boat nomenclature. List the parts of a boat and explain  boat  construction. As used in this text,  nomenclature  refers to the names given to the various parts or fittings of a boat. Most boats in service in today's Navy are of molded fiber glass or of metal skeletons to which metal plates have been attached to form a hull. Figure 5-1 gives you an idea of how a boat is constructed. The backbone of the skeleton is called a keel, and its ribs are the frames. Bilges are the inner parts Figure 5-1.–Names of boat parts. 5-1

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