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Reeving Gantlines
Figure  4-31.–Rigging  for  self-lowering. jackets.  Except  for  personnel  in  boats,  personnel working  over  the  side  must  be  equipped  with  a parachute-type safety harness with safety lines tended from  the  deck  above. All  personnel  should  be  instructed  in  all  applicable safety regulations before they are permitted to work over the side of the ship on scaffolding, stages, or in boatswain's chairs. A   competent   petty   officer   must   constantly supervise  personnel  working  on  scaffolding,  stages,  and in boatswain's chairs, and personnel must be assigned to tend the safety lines. When  personnel  are  doing  hot-work  such  as welding or cutting while working over-the-side or aloft, fiber lines could burn and cause a serious mishap. To prevent this, replace all personnel safety lines and the fiber lines on the staging and boatswain chairs with wire rope. The Navy uses Corrosion Resistant Steel (CRES) wire rope. However, since the Navy supply system does not carry pre-assembled working or safety lines made of CRES, you must make them yourself. When doing hot-work over the side, replace the nonadjustable,  fiber-rope,  working  lanyard  and  the fiber-rope safety lanyard (DYNA-BRAKE, if needed) used with the safety harness with a 3/16-inch-diameter CRES wire rope. The wire rope should be 6-feet long (including  the  DYNA-BRAKE,  if  needed)  with double-locking snap hooks at each end. Secure both hooks directly to the wire rope, using wire-rope thimbles and  swaging. All tools, buckets, paint pots, and brushes used by personnel working over the side of the ship should be secured by lanyards to prevent their loss overboard or injury  to  personnel  below. STAGE The stage is a stout plank to the underside of which two short wooden horns are attached athwartships, either by nailing or bolting on, a foot or two from either end. When the stage is rigged properly, all the weight comes on the plank. The chief purpose of the horns is to hold the plank off the side. The gantlines on your stage may be rigged in one of two ways. The first is by an eye splice in the end of the 4-39

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