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Figure  3-18.–Rolling  hitch. When tying the rolling hitch, take a turn around the line with the stopper as in view 1 of figure 3-18. Pull taut, then take another turn. This turn must cross over the first (view 1) and pass between the first turn and the stopper  (view  2).  The  rolling  hitch  itself  is  now complete, but it must be stopped off in one of several ways. You may take two or more turns with the lay of the line and then marry the stopper to the line by hand or seize the stopper to the line with marline. Another method is to tie a half hitch directly above the rolling hitch (view 3), then take a couple of turns against the lay, and marry or seize the stopper to the line. A  clove  hitch  is  the  best  all-round  knot  for bending to a ring, spar, or anything else that is round or nearly round. This is such a fine knot that the old-time seamen used to call a man who was worth his salt “all in a clove hitch.” Figure 3-19 shows you how to throw one. A clove hitch will not jam and seldom pulls out. A slack clove hitch, as on a boat painter, however, might work itself out. For that reason, it is a good idea to put a half hitch in the end as in figure 3-20. A half hitch, by the way, never becomes a whole hitch. Put another one on, and all you have is two half hitches, as shown. The slight disadvantage a clove hitch might have is that it can slide along a slippery spar when the strain is along the spar. The knot that cannot slide this way  is  the  stopper  hitch  (fig.  3-21).  This  knot  is especially useful for bending a boat painter to a larger line whose end is unavailable. It jams tight on a hard strain,  however. SPLICES LEARNING   OBJECTIVES:   Define   line splices.  Identify  the  types  of  splices. Splices are used to make permanent eyes and permanent repairs in lines. There are three general types of splices: eye, short, and long. When splicing fiber line, you should take three or four tucks with each strand. Figure 3-19.–Throwing a clove hitch. 3-14

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