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High-Compression Steamer - 14164_88
closing    the    valve,    as    necessary.    The    fault normally  is  stoppage  in  the  trap,  strainer,  or drainpipe.  To  eliminate  this  condition,  close  the steam   valve,   remove   the   steam-trap   strainer basket, and clean it by scraping out the solids and washing the basket until the mesh or perforations are open and clear. Clean the pipe connection in the    steamer    compartment,     reassemble     the strainer, and repeat the pressure cooking. If there is still no drip, the steam trap is at fault, so report this   to   the   engineer   officer   via   the   chain   of command. After each meal, the steamer should be brush- scrubbed,  washed  clean  with  hot  soapy  water, and rinsed with hot water (170°F) and allowed to air dry. HIGH-COMPRESSION STEAMER The  high-compression  steamer  (fig.  4-10)  is  a modular unit that is used to defrost and cook food by using high-velocity steam. When steam enters the unit, it is piped to a jet box from  which  it  is jetted     directly     onto     the     frozen     food     at approximately  200  miles  per  hour  (mph).  The steam  gains  the  high  velocity  by  being  forced through a series of small perforations. 48.132 Figure 4-10.—High-compression steamer Operation Check the steam supply gauge; 15 psi is needed for  proper  operation.  Insert  foods  into  the  cooking chamber; then place the frozen food directly under the jet box; close and seal the door. Select the time (from  5  to  60  minutes)  for  the  food  to  be  cooked. Turn  the  selector  switch  to  60  minutes  and  then back  to  the  desired  cooking  time.  The  pilot  light indicates   that   cooking   is   in   progress.   Food   is defrosted  and  cooked  auto-matically.  The  pressure gauge rises to approxi-mately 5 psi and increases to 15  psi  after  2  minutes,  where  it  will  stay  until cooking has been completed. The door must be kept locked until the cooking  cycle  has  been  completed. All steam will exhaust automatically and the buzzer will   sound   when   the   cooking   cycle   has   been completed. Care and Cleaning The steamer should be cleaned at the end of each day that it has been used. To clean the jet steamer, remove   the   jet   plate,   pan   supports,   and   door, including the gasket around the door, and wash in warm   soapy   water.   Rinse   well   in   warm   water. Scrub the interior of the cylinder with warm soapy water and rinse well. The door gasket must be kept clean at all times. With   normal   closing   and   locking   of   the   door assembly,   a   steamtight   seal   should    be    made between the door gasket and the door opening. This seal  cannot  be  maintained  if  particles  of  foreign matter are allowed to accumulate upon either of the contacting surfaces. If leakage of steam occurs, the door assembly is improperly  adjusted  and  a  readjustment  must  be made to the adjustment screw. VENTILATOR HOODS Ventilator    hoods,    like    people,    come    in    a variety    of    shapes,  sizes,  and  appearances,  and vary    in  their  effectiveness  from  barely  acceptable to    highly  efficient.        The    filter-type    hoods    fall into   the   barely   acceptable    category,    and    the filterless    grease    extractors–mostly    known    as Gaylord  ventilators–are  the most efficient.  Filter- type  hoods  are  the  hardest  to   keep  clean  and are    gradually    being  re-placed  as  funds  allow. They   generally   have   no   built-in   fire   protection system. If the filters are not replaced after cleaning, a  buildup  of  grease  deposits  in  the  exhaust  duct system  could  lead  to  a  fire!  Depending  upon  the type of fumes exhausted and the amount of use, the filter   should   be   removed   and   washed   in   the dishwasher or  deep sink daily,  or no less than once 4-13

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