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Hearing Conservation Program
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Naval Safety Supervisor - Military manual on safety practices
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Hazardous Material/Hazardous Waste Program
Figure 5-3.—Hazardous  noise  labels. The person qualified to take the noise measurements uses  a  sound  level  meter  to  identify  all  potentially hazardous noise areas. The work areas where the sound level, continuous or intermittent, is routinely greater than 84 dB(A) or where the peak sound pressure level, caused by impulse or impact noise, routinely exceeds 140 dB are considered hazardous noise areas. These areas and equipment are then labeled to warn of the noise hazard. Hearing  Tests/Audiograms Hearing  tests,  or  audiograms,  are  required monitor the hearing of workers routinely exposed hazardous  noise.  Periodic  monitoring  will  allow  us catch  a  hearing  loss  before  it  becomes  severe  or to to to to correct  potential  problems  with  hearing-protective devices. Audiograms test a person’s hearing at a variety of frequencies in the human speech range. Audiograms can be conducted at most Navy clinics, aboard tenders, and aboard air capable surface ships. Personnel working in hazardous noise areas must be entered  in  the  Hearing  Conservation  Program.  Military personnel should have received a reference hearing test upon entry into naval service. Civilian personnel being considered  for  employment  in  an  occupational  specialty or area that involves routine exposure to hazardous noise should receive a reference audiogram. Navy employees presently  in  service  who  do  not  have  a  reference audiogram  filed  in  their  health  record  will  not  be assigned  to  duty  in  designated  hazardous  noise  areas until they receive a reference hearing test. All personnel should receive a hearing test periodically and before ending their naval service or civilian service. Labelling  of  Hazardous  Noise Areas  and  Equipment Make  sure  you  label  designated  noise-hazardous areas with the approved 8-inch by 10.5-inch decal (fig. 5-3).  Normally,  you  should  apply  the  proper  decals  to the outside of all doors or hatches leading into the noise-hazardous area. That ensures personnel know what protection they must wear in that area. Label equipment,  such  as  hand  tools,  with  the  approved 2-   by   2-inch   hazardous   noise   sticker,   NAVMED 6260/2A  (fig.  5-3).  This  sticker  ensures  personnel  know whether to wear single or double protection when using that  equipment. Personal Hearing-Protective Devices When  a  hazardous  noise  area  or  operation  is identified, we try to control or eliminate that noise hazard  using  engineering  controls.  These  controls include the use of acoustic material, the isolation of noisy equipment, or the substitution of a less noisy process.  If  we  cannot  reduce  the  noise  to  a  safe  level, then our only choice is the use of personal protective 5-8

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