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Naval Safety Supervisor - Military manual on safety practices
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Chapter 9 - Explosives Safety
Damage to hearing occurs when you expose your ears to high sound intensities for excessive periods. The higher the sound intensity, the shorter the period of exposure that will produce damage. As stated in an earlier chapter, exposures above an 84-dB(A) sound intensity, without hearing protection, can cause hearing damage. The   wearing   of   approved   earplugs   or   sound attenuators  will  protect  you  from  hearing  loss.  In extremely high noise level areas, such as the flight line, even  double  protection  may  not  be  enough  protection. In such cases, time limits are set for allowable exposures to noise. Wearing hearing protection can raise the limits of time exposure. All personnel working within danger areas  should  be  familiar  with  calculated  decibel  levels (as specified in the applicable maintenance instruction manual)  and  should  wear  the  required  protective equipment. Movable Surface Hazards Movable surfaces such as flight control surfaces, speed brakes, power-operated canopies, and landing gear doors are a major hazard to flight line personnel. These  units  are  normally  operated  during  ground operations and maintenance. Therefore, you should ensure that all personnel and equipment are clear of the area before operating any movable surface. SUMMARY In this chapter, we addressed the scope and goal of the Naval Aviation Safety Program. We covered the concepts  and  individual  responsibilities  associated  with the safety program. We discussed the command aviation safety  program  functions  and  its  elements.  We examined hazard reports, naval aircraft mishap reports, and  mishap  investigation  reports.  We  considered  the endorsements required on both hazard reports and mishap investigation reports. We examined general shipboard aircraft safety. Finally, we discussed the importance of monitoring mishap corrective actions. We did not intend for this chapter to make you an expert  in  naval  aviation  safety.  The  chapter  was developed  to  provide  you  with  a  basic  introduction  to aviation safety as well as the references you should consult  for  additional  information. 8-15

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