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Hans Selye
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Navy Counselor 1 & C (Recruiter) - Military manual for recruiting
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Type A Behavior
has had great success in this mode of prospecting will view  the  demand  as  a  eustressor.  On  the  other  hand, a more introverted recruiter who has not met with those  successes  may  view  PDCing  as  a  distressor. Your job is to help minimize this recruiter’s distress through  training  and  positive  experience. STRESS RESPONSE It is important to understand how we respond to stress when learning how to manage it. Responding effectively  to  stress  depends  on  how  well  prepared  we are  before  the  stress  is  introduced. Effective  Stress  Response Figure  3-6  shows  an  effective  stress  response.  We have  a  normal  resistance  level  that  allows  us  to  keep calm  and  collected.  When  a  stressor  is  introduced,  we respond  to  it  by  some  sort  of  mobilization.  Our arousal level is raised. When the situation is over, our normal resistance drops to a lower than normal level. With time to rest and relax, we regain our normal level of resistance so we are prepared to meet the next stressor. Ineffective  Stress  Response Have  you  ever  had  one  of  those  days  when everything that could go wrong did? When our day becomes  too  hectic  and  we  me  forced  to  meet  a continuous barrage of stressors, our stress response may end up looking like the one shown in figure 3-7. As the day started we had our normal resistance level. As  we  met  each  stressor  with  different  levels  of arousal, we never had the chance to rest and relax. Figure 3-6.—Effective stress response. Figure 3-7.—Ineffective stress response. Our normal resistance level was never restored. We were less and less prepared to meet the stressors as the day wore on. When we finally did get to sleep, it was  too  late.  We  ended  up  waking  up  feeling unrested.   What   can   we   do   about   those   days? Obviously, we can’t just walk away from problems. We can, however, take time during the day to restore our normal resistance level. Walk around the block. Try deep breathing exercises – whatever works for you. PSYCHOLOGICAL  ASPECTS  OF STRESS We have looked at the physical aspects of stress. What   about   the   psychological   side   of   stress management?   Another   leader   in   the   field   of occupational stress is a psychologist named Dr. Joseph E. McGrath. McGrath’s Definition of Stress McGrath  said,  “Stress  is  the  consequence  of confronting  a  situation  in  which  usual  modes  of behaving  are  insufficient  and  the  consequences  of  not adapting  are  serious.”  This  really  sounds  like recruiting  duty. New recruiters will face situations where their normal rate training is insufficient. If they don’t adapt to the recruiting environment, they will face   unpleasant   consequences   such   as   loss   of confidence  and  maybe  even  transfer. Self-Concept Stress usually involves a demand or obstacle that we feel we don’t have the ability to handle. This is where  recruiters’  self-concept  can  affect  the  way  they deal with stress. People’s self-concept is the core of their  personality.  It  affects  how  they  see  themselves, 3-16

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