Quantcast Ratings and Occupational Areas

Click Here to
Order this information in Print

Click Here to
Order this information on CD-ROM

Click Here to
Download this information in PDF Format

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Ratings and Occupational Areas
Back | Up | Next

Click here for a printable version

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Combat
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
USMC
   
Products
  Educational CD-ROM's
Printed Manuals
Downloadable Books

   


 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Rating Structure
Up
Personnelman 3 & 2 - Military manual for government personnel administration
Next
Occupational Fields
separate salary level. As we discussed earlier, these levels  are  known  as  paygrades  and  are  commonly referred  to  as  rates. Rates  identify  personnel  by paygrades E- 1 through E-9. In the Navy’s paygrade structure, enlisted rates are divided into three groups: (1) general rates, (2) petty officers,  and  (3)  chief  petty  officers.  As  described earlier, general rates represent the apprenticeships and include personnel in paygrades E- 1 through E-3; petty officers include enlisted personnel in paygrades E-4 through E-6, and chief petty officers include senior enlisted personnel in paygrades E-7 through E-9. RATINGS  AND  OCCUPATIONAL  AREAS Ratings  are  defined  as  broad  enlisted  career  fields. They  identify  occupational  specialties  that  encompass related  aptitudes,  training,  experience,  knowledge,  and skills  for  the  purpose  of  career  development  and advancement. A particular Navy rating refers to a specific  occupational  area. As a PN, you must be able to identify Navy ratings in  terms  of  their  occupational  fields  so  you  can understand the various duties and responsibilities of the enlisted  personnel  working  in  these  ratings.  Your knowledge of the occupational fields will help you to develop a better understanding of the different ratings and  to  become  a  better  PN.  Sometime  in  your  career, for example, you will likely counsel someone who is interested  in  striking  for  a  particular  rating,  and  you must be able to provide the right kind of information. As you progress in your career, you will be assigned to  various  duty  stations  where  you  will  meet  personnel who work in many Navy ratings, and you will need to know  what  they  do. Remember,   personnel requirements depend on the mission of your command, and you will not encounter personnel in all Navy ratings at  every  command  to  which  you  are  assigned.  For example,  you  will  not  see  air  traffic  controllers  (ACs) serving  aboard  guided  missile  destroyers  (DDGs). Why? Because the special skills of the ACs are not required  aboard  DDGs.  These  skills,  however,  are required  aboard  aircraft  carriers  (CVs).  Logically,  you will see ACs serving aboard aircraft carriers where their special  skills  are  needed. The jobs Navy personnel perform are just as diverse as civilian occupations. The Navy is an accumulated group of people who work together in many fields to accomplish  the  overall  mission.  While  some  ratings  are Table  2-3.—Occupational  Fields  and  Associated  Ratings 2-6

Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us - Support Integrated Publishing

Integrated Publishing, Inc.