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Latitude by Local Apparent Noon (LAN), Continued - 14220_296
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Quartermaster 1 & C - Military manual for the Quartermaster rate
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Topics - 14220_298
Chapter 10 Weather Observation Introduction The  people  who  "go  down  to  the  sea  in  ships"  fight  a  continuous  close battle  with  the  elements  that  make  up  the  weather.  A  mariner’s  watch of  weather  conditions  is  of  greater  importance  than  it  is  to  most  people ashore.  Accurate  weather  forecasting  may  not  be  as  vital  now  as  it  was in  the  days  of  the  sailing  ships,  but  situations  still  arise  when  the  safety of  a  ship  and  the  lives  of  its  crew  depend  on  the  evasive  action  taken  to avoid  the  full  fury  of  a  storm.  Even  when  actual  safety  is  not considered,  possible  damage  to  the  ship’s  boats  and  gear  must  be minimized  by  extra  security  measures  taken  well  in  advance  of  an approaching  storm. The  action  taken  by  ships  may  be  based  on  the  latest  weather information  compiled  and  broadcast  by  the  appropriate  Naval Oceanographic  Center.  The  oceanographic  centers  base  their  predictions largely  upon  the  reports  of  weather  conditions  received  from  ships  at sea.  An  intelligent  weather  report  from  a  ship  can  be  made  only  by  a person  capable  of  accurately  observing  and  (to  some  extent)  interpreting weather  conditions.  Aerographer’s  mates  are  charged  with  this  duty,  but not  all  ships  carry  them.  On  a  ship  that  doesn’t  have  an  Aerographer’s Mate  aboard,  the  weather  observation  duties  are  the  responsibility  of  the Quartermasters.  This  chapter,  then,  is  concerned  with  the  weather  and the  way  it  is  observed  and  reported. Objectives The  material  in  this  chapter  will  enable  the  student  to: Measure,  convert,  and  record  barometric  pressure. Determine  apparent  wind,  relative  wind,  and  true  wind  using anemometers  or  visual  estimation. Identify  cloud  types  and  match  them  with  their  correct  heights. Measure  temperature,  dew  point,  and  relative  humidity. Convert  temperature  to  Celsius  or  Fahrenheit. Observe  and  report  weather  conditions  using  form  CNOC  3140/8. Describe  weather  conditions  associated  with  fronts. Recommend  course  of  action  to  evade  storms. 10-l

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