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The Atmosphere - 14220_299
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Circulation of the Wind Upon Earth, Continued - 14220_301
Circulation of the Wind Upon Earth The  Basics The  following  paragraphs  deal  with  the  general  (surface)  circulation  with prevailing  winds  and  nearby  permanent  pressure  systems  of  belts.  (See fig.  10-1).  In  the  Northern  Hemisphere,  the  circulation  is  clockwise about  high-pressure  areas  (called  anticyclones)  and  counterclockwise about  low-pressure  areas  (called  cyclones).  The  reverse  is  true  in  the Southern  Hemisphere.  At  times,  confusion  arises  from  the  meaning  of wind  direction.  Wind  is  always  named  by  the  direction  from  which  it  is blowing. The Doldrums The  equatorial  belt  of  light  and  variable  winds  between  the  northeast tradewinds  of  the  Northern  Hemisphere  and  the  southeast  trade  winds  of the  Southern  Hemisphere  is  called  the  doldrums,  or  the  intertropical convergence  zone. The  doldrums  may  vary  in  position.  They  tend  to  move  north  and  south of  the  Equator  with  the  Sun,  though  more  of  the  area  is  generally located  slightly  north  of  the  Equator.  In  the  doldrums,  the  temperatures are  high  and  the  wind  convergent  (a  net  inflow  of  air  into  the  area), which  causes  greater  rainfall. Figure  10-1.  General  circulation  of  air. 10-4

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